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Effect of Changing Sliding Speed on Wear Behavior of Mild Carbon Steel

  • Han-Young LeeEmail author
Article

Abstract

This study investigates the effect of a change in the sliding speed on the wear behavior of mild steel and, in particular, the influence of the original speed on the wear behavior at subsequent speeds, in order to utilize it for the tribosystems design. The sliding wear tests were conducted by using a combination of changing conditions between two of three different sliding speeds in a pin-on-disc type wear testing machine: two sliding speeds with mild wear behavior and a sliding speed with severe wear behavior. It was obvious that the wear behavior after the speed change was highly dependent on the formation of oxides on the worn surface at each speed. When the speed changed between two speeds at which a mild wear behavior is exhibited, there was no significant difference in the sliding wear behavior before and after the speed change. When the speed changed from 0.3 and 3 m/s with a mild wear behavior to 1 m/s with a severe wear behavior, there was no significant increase in the wear rate. In contrast, the wear rate rapidly decreased at a subsequent speed change to 0.3 and 3 m/s. The time required until the steady-state wear condition was attained at the sliding speed of 0.3 m/s was significantly longer than that at 3 m/s.

Graphic Abstract

Keywords

Changing sliding speed Mild wear behavior Severe wear behavior Wear rate Oxides 

Notes

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Copyright information

© The Korean Institute of Metals and Materials 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Advanced Materials EngineeringKeimyung UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea

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