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Nivolumab-induced Thyroid Dysfunctions in Patients with Previously Treated Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  • Xinyong Zhang
  • Yuhua Wu
  • Jialin Lv
  • Xi Li
  • Li Ma
  • Jingying Nong
  • Hui Zhang
  • Na Qin
  • Quan Zhang
  • Guangli Shi
  • Xinjie Yang
  • Jinghui WangEmail author
  • Shucai ZhangEmail author
Original research article
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Nivolumab, a fully human IgG4 programmed cell death-1 checkpoint inhibitor, demonstrated its benefit of prolonged survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, nivolumab generated unique immune-related adverse events such as thyroid dysfunctions. Herein we assessed nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunctions in patients with previously treated advanced NSCLC in our hospital.

Methods

The medical records of 11 patients with advanced NSCLC who were initiated with nivolumab treatment between June 28, 2018, and January 15, 2019, in our hospital were reviewed. Serological tests of thyroid-stimulating hormone and free tetraiodothyronine were measured at baseline and every 8 weeks.

Results

Three out of 11 patients developed new-onset hypothyroidism during the treatment, and two of three patients had transient hyperthyroidism first. Two patients were diagnosed with Grade 2 hypothyroidism and received levothyroxine therapy. The other one was Grade 1 hypothyroidism and asymptomatic. All these three patients continued nivolumab therapy.

Conclusion

Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunctions in advanced NSCLC were mostly mild and controlled. Thyroid function needs to be monitored for early prediction and appropriate managements of thyroid dysfunctions.

Keywords

Non-small cell lung cancer Anti-PD-1 antibody Nivolumab Thyroid Dysfunction Immunotherapy 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declared that they have no conflicts of interest in this study.

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Copyright information

© International Association of Scientists in the Interdisciplinary Areas 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xinyong Zhang
    • 1
  • Yuhua Wu
    • 1
  • Jialin Lv
    • 1
  • Xi Li
    • 1
  • Li Ma
    • 1
  • Jingying Nong
    • 1
  • Hui Zhang
    • 1
  • Na Qin
    • 1
  • Quan Zhang
    • 1
  • Guangli Shi
    • 2
  • Xinjie Yang
    • 1
  • Jinghui Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Shucai Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Medical Oncology, Beijing Chest HospitalCapital Medical University, Beijing Tuberculosis and Thoracic Tumor Research InstituteBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Laboratory, Beijing Chest HospitalCapital Medical University, Beijing Tuberculosis and Thoracic Tumor Research InstituteBeijingChina

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