Advertisement

Screening, Isolation and Identification of Probiotic Producing Lactobacillus acidophilus Strains EMBS081 & EMBS082 by 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing

  • Harshpreet Chandok
  • Pratik Shah
  • Uday Raj Akare
  • Maliram Hindala
  • Sneha Singh Bhadoriya
  • G. V. Ravi
  • Varsha Sharma
  • Srinivas Bandaru
  • Pragya Rathore
  • Anuraj NayarisseriEmail author
Original Research Article

Abstract

16S rDNA sequencing which has gained wide popularity amongst microbiologists for the molecular characterization and identification of newly discovered isolates provides accurate identification of isolates down to the level of sub-species (strain). Its most important advantage over the traditional biochemical characterization methods is that it can provide an accurate identification of strains with atypical phenotypic characters as well. The following work is an application of 16S rRNA gene sequencing approach to identify a novel species of Probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus. The sample was collected from pond water samples of rural and urban areas of Krishna district, Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India. Subsequently, the sample was serially diluted and the aliquots were incubated for a suitable time period following which the suspected colony was subjected to 16S rDNA sequencing. The sequence aligned against other species was concluded to be a novel, Probiotic L. acidophilus bacteria, further which were named L. acidophilus strain EMBS081 & EMBS082. After the sequence characterization, the isolate was deposited in GenBank Database, maintained by the National Centre for Biotechnology Information NCBI. The sequence can also be retrieve from EMBL and DDBJ repositories with accession numbers JX255677 and KC150145.

Keywords

Lactobacillus acidophilus Probiotic Lactobacillus  16srRNA sequencing Lactobacillus acidophilus strain EMBS081 Lactobacillus acidophilus strain EMBS082 

References

  1. 1.
    Macfarlane GT, Cummings JH (1999) Probiotics and prebiotics: can regulating the activities of intestinal bacteria benefit health. West J Med 171(3):187–191PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Verschuere L, Rombaut G, Sorgeloos P (2000) Probiotic bacteria as biological control agents in aquaculture. Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 64(4):655–671CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Balcázar JL, de Blas I, Ruiz-Zarzuela I, Cunningham D, Vendrell D, Múzquiz JL (2006) The role of probiotics in aquaculture. Vet Microbiol 114(3–4):173–186CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ninawe AS, Selvin J (2009) Probiotics in shrimp aquaculture: avenues and challenges. Crit Rev Microbiol 35(1):43–66CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Gupta V, Garg R (2009) Probiotics. Indian J Med Microbiol 27(3):202–209CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Corthésy B, Gaskins HR, Mercenier A (2007) Cross-talk between probiotic bacteria and the host immune system. J Nutr 137(3 Suppl 2):781S–790SCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Van Gossum A, Dewit O, Louis E, de Hertogh G, Baert F, Fontaine F, DeVos M, Enslen M, Paintin M, Franchimont D (2007) Multicenter randomized-controlled clinical trial of probiotics (Lactobacillus johnsonii, LA1) on early endoscopic recurrence of Crohn’s disease after lleo-caecal resection. Inflamm Bowel Dis 13(2):135–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Hickson M, D’Souza AL, Muthu N, Rogers TR, Want S, Rajkumar C, Bulpitt CJ (2007) Use of probiotic Lactobacillus preparation to prevent diarrhoea associated with antibiotics: randomised double blind placebo controlled trial. BMJ 335(7610):80CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lin YP, Thibodeaux CH, Peña JA, Ferry GD, Versalovic J (2008) Probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri suppress proinflammatory cytokines via c-Jun. Inflamm Bowel Dis 14(8):1068–1083CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Elguezabal N, Chamorro S, Molina E, Garrido JM, Izeta A, Rodrigo L (2012) Juste RA (2012) Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Gut Pathog 4:6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hempel S, Newberry SJ, Maher AR, Wang Z, Miles JN, Shanman R, Johnsen B, Shekelle PG (2012) Probiotics for the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea: a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA 307(18):1959–1969CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kesarcodi-Watson A, Heinrich KM, Lategan J, Gibson L (2008) Probiotics in aquaculture: the need, principles and mechanisms of action and screening processes. Aquaculture 274(2008):1–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sahu MK, Swarnakumar NS, Sivakumar K, Thangaradjou T, Kannan L (2008) Probiotics in aquaculture: importance and future perspectives. Indian J Microbiol 48(3):299–308CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Liu KX, Zhu YG, Zhang J, Tao LL, Lee JW, Wang XD, Qu JM (2012) Probiotics’ effects on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Critical Care 2012(16):R109CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Desfossés-Foucault É, Dussault-Lepage V, Le Boucher C, Savard P, LaPointe G, Roy D (2012) Assessment of probiotic viability during Cheddar cheese manufacture and ripening using propidium monoazide-PCR quantification. Front Microbiol 3:350CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Verna EC (2010) Use of probiotics in gastrointestinal disorders: What to recommend? Therap Adv Gastroenterol 3(5):307–319CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Neal-McKinney JM, Lu X, Duong T, Larson CL, Call DR, Shah DH, Konkel ME (2012) Production of organic acids by probiotic lactobacilli can be used to reduce pathogen load in poultry. PLoS One 7(9):e43928CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© International Association of Scientists in the Interdisciplinary Areas and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harshpreet Chandok
    • 1
  • Pratik Shah
    • 1
  • Uday Raj Akare
    • 1
  • Maliram Hindala
    • 1
  • Sneha Singh Bhadoriya
    • 1
  • G. V. Ravi
    • 1
  • Varsha Sharma
    • 1
  • Srinivas Bandaru
    • 2
  • Pragya Rathore
    • 3
  • Anuraj Nayarisseri
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Bioinformatics Research LaboratoryEminent BiosciencesIndoreIndia
  2. 2.Institute of Genetics and Hospital for Genetic DiseasesOsmania UniversityBegumpet, HyderabadIndia
  3. 3.Department of BiotechnologySanghvi Institute of Management & ScienceIndoreIndia

Personalised recommendations