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Leveraging Robotics Research for Children with Autism: A Review

  • Luthffi Idzhar Ismail
  • Thibault Verhoeven
  • Joni Dambre
  • Francis Wyffels
Article
  • 8 Downloads

Abstract

Robotics research in helping children with autism has gained increased attention in recent years. Children with autism often struggle with neurodevelopmental disorders that affect their lives particularly in communication skills, social interaction and their repetitive stereotyped behavior. In this article, we highlight previous findings on human–robot interaction for children with autism. To date, it has been claimed that child–robot interaction is a beneficial approach in helping children with autism to improve their quality of life. Based on an extensive search of the literature, we identified three major research gaps: (1) diversity in research focus, (2) bias contribution in robotics research towards specific behavior impairments in autism and, (3) effectiveness of human–robot interaction after robot-based intervention program. Therefore, this review paper shall identify and thoroughly discuss published works that address the research gaps found in this areas. This article is therefore seen as a crucial step in bridging the gap between robotics research and children with autism. The results presented could be beneficial for researchers in determining future directions for robotics research in helping children with autism.

Keywords

Human–robot interaction Robotics Children with autism 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Thank you to Farah Nadia Moksin, Wan Farah Wani Wan Fakhruddin and Lindsay J. G. McCutcheon for their contributions in this work.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

Luthffi Idzhar Ismail received a Postgraduate Education Fund from Majlis Amanah Rakyat, MARA (MARA REF: 330407445608)

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electronics and Information Systems, Faculty of Engineering and ArchitectureGhent University - imecGhentBelgium

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