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Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 76–81 | Cite as

Reactivation of intraabdominal tuberculous lymphadenopathy after drug-eluting beads transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma

  • Yosuke Murata
  • Katsushi Hiramatsu
  • Yumi Yoshida
  • Yu Akazawa
  • Yasushi Saito
  • Takuto Nosaka
  • Yoshihiko Ozaki
  • Ryoko Hayama
  • Kazuto Takahashi
  • Tatsushi Naito
  • Kazuya Ofuji
  • Hidetaka Matsuda
  • Masahiro Ohtani
  • Tomoyuki Nemoto
  • Yasunari NakamotoEmail author
Case Report
  • 70 Downloads

Abstract

Owing to effective treatments and sanitary improvements, the incidence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) has decreased. However, approximately one-quarter of the world’s population is thought to have LTBI, and the reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) sometimes occurs in immunocompromised hosts. A 54-year-old man presented with a fever. The patient had past histories of alcoholic and hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He was treated with drug-eluting beads transarterial chemoembolization (DEB-TACE) for HCC three times, beginning 10 months before his current visit. A computed tomography scan showed enlarged intraabdominal lymph nodes with calcification, and the interferon-gamma release assay for TB infection was positive. The patient was diagnosed with tuberculous reactivation. Anti-TB therapy was administered to the patient, after which we restarted TACE and the TB infection remains controlled. In this case, we presumed that DEB-TACE is associated with the reactivation of TB infection and that anthracycline increases the risk of reactivating TB infection. In summary, we experienced a case of TB reactivation during the clinical course of a patient with HCC who was treated with DEB-TACE. When patients with HCC are treated with TACE, their symptoms, laboratory data, and imaging results should be monitored when latent TB infections are suspected.

Keywords

Tuberculosis reactivation Drug-eluting beads transcatheter arterial chemoembolization Hepatocellular carcinoma 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human/Animal Rights

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1964 and its latter amendments.

Informed consent

Was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Gastroenterology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yosuke Murata
    • 1
  • Katsushi Hiramatsu
    • 1
  • Yumi Yoshida
    • 1
  • Yu Akazawa
    • 1
  • Yasushi Saito
    • 1
  • Takuto Nosaka
    • 1
  • Yoshihiko Ozaki
    • 1
  • Ryoko Hayama
    • 1
  • Kazuto Takahashi
    • 1
  • Tatsushi Naito
    • 1
  • Kazuya Ofuji
    • 1
  • Hidetaka Matsuda
    • 1
  • Masahiro Ohtani
    • 1
  • Tomoyuki Nemoto
    • 1
  • Yasunari Nakamoto
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Second Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medical SciencesUniversity of FukuiFukuiJapan

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