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International Journal of Material Forming

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 79–87 | Cite as

Effect of powder metallurgy synthesis parameters for pure aluminium on resultant mechanical properties

  • Jinghang Liu
  • Javier Silveira
  • Robert GroarkeEmail author
  • Sohan Parab
  • Harshaan Singh
  • Eanna McCarthy
  • Shadi Karazi
  • Andre Mussatto
  • Jared Houghtaling
  • Inam Ul Ahad
  • Sumsun Naher
  • Dermot Brabazon
Original Research
  • 202 Downloads

Abstract

In this work, pure aluminium powders of different average particle size were compacted, sintered into discs and tested for mechanical strength at different strain rates. The effects of average particle size (15, 19, and 35 μm), sintering rate (5 and 20 °C/min) and sample indentation test speed (0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 mm/min) were examined. A compaction pressure of 332 MPa with a holding time of six minutes was used to produce the green compacted discs. The consolidated green specimens were sintered with a holding time of 4 h, a temperature of 600 °C in an argon atmosphere. The resulting sintered samples contained higher than 85% density. The mechanical properties and microstructure were characterized using indentation strength measurement tests and SEM analysis respectively. After sintering, the aluminium grain structure was observed to be of uniform size within the fractured samples. The indentation test measurements showed that for the same sintering rate, the 35 μm powder particle size provided the highest radial and tangential strength while the 15 μm powder provided the lowest strengths. Another important finding from this work was the increase in sintered sample strength which was achieved using the lower sinter heating rate, 5 °C/min. This resulted in a tangential stress value of 365 MPa which was significantly higher than achieved, 244 MPa, using the faster sintering heating rate, 20 °C/min.

Keywords

Aluminium Powder metallurgy (P/M) Indentation Sintering Green compaction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is supported in part by a research grant from Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) under Grant Number 16/RC/3872 and is co-funded under the European Regional Development Fund and by I-Form industry partners.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag France SAS, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jinghang Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Javier Silveira
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Groarke
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Sohan Parab
    • 1
    • 2
  • Harshaan Singh
    • 1
    • 2
  • Eanna McCarthy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shadi Karazi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Andre Mussatto
    • 2
  • Jared Houghtaling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Inam Ul Ahad
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sumsun Naher
    • 1
    • 3
  • Dermot Brabazon
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Advanced Processing Technology Research CentreDublin City UniversityDublin 9Ireland
  2. 2.School of Mechanical & Manufacturing EngineeringDublin City UniversityDublin 9Ireland
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical Engineering and AeronauticsCity University LondonLondonUK

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