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Detection of EBV DNA in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients in Bulgaria

  • Tsvetelina KostadinovaEmail author
  • Liliya Ivanova Ivanova
  • Tatina Todorova Todorova
  • Zhivka Stoykova
  • Dobromir Staykov
  • Merlin Efraim
  • Liana Gercheva
Original Article
  • 6 Downloads

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus is the first human oncogenic virus associated with a broad range of different malignant diseases but its role in non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) development still needs to be fully understood. High expression levels of EBV major genes are found in NHL tumor cells and free viral DNA circulates in the plasma of such individuals. In the current study we detected EBV DNA levels in plasma samples from NHL patients in order to validate its significance as a laboratory marker for disease monitoring. We investigated a cohort of 52 patients diagnosed with NHL in The University Hospital “St. Marina” Varna, Bulgaria. Viral DNA was extracted from single plasma samples using Kit Ribo Virus (Sacace Biotechnologies S.r.l., Como, Italy) and amplified with EBV Real-TM Quant (Sacace Biotechnologies S.r.l., Como, Italy). Plasma samples of the same patients were tested for presence of EBV VCA IgM/IgG antibodies with indirect ELISA tests (Euroimmun, Luebeck, Germany). We found 15.4% (95% CI 6.9–28.1%, n = 8) of the samples from NHL patients to be positive in quantitative PCR (range 674–221,333 copies/ml). The diffuse large B cell lymphomas and peripheral T cell lymphomas were most often associated (although not statistically significant, p = 0.167) with detectable plasma EBV DNA levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study about the role of EBV in NHL development in Bulgaria. The results we have obtained should stimulate new, larger investigations to apply the quantitative PCR technique in the routine laboratory EBV diagnosis.

Keywords

Epstein–Barr virus Non-Hodgkin lymphoma EBV DNA 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Authors declare absence of any conflict of interest related to this manuscript.

Financial Support

This project received a Grant No 16003/2016 from the Medical University Varna.

Ethical Approval

The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Medical University Varna.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society of Hematology and Blood Transfusion 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical CollegeMedical University VarnaVarnaBulgaria
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and VirologyMedical University VarnaVarnaBulgaria
  3. 3.Laboratory of Clinical Virology“St. Marina” University HospitalVarnaBulgaria
  4. 4.Department of Preclinical and Clinical SciencesMedical University VarnaVarnaBulgaria
  5. 5.Center for Transfusion HematologyVarnaBulgaria
  6. 6.Clinic of HematologyUniversity Hospital “St. Marina”VarnaBulgaria

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