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Outcomes of Oral Metronomic Therapy in Patients with Lymphomas

  • Sharada Mailankody
  • Prasanth Ganesan
  • Archit Joshi
  • Trivadi S. Ganesan
  • Venkatraman Radhakrishnan
  • Manikandan Dhanushkodi
  • Nikita Mehra
  • Jayachandran Perumal Kalaiyarasi
  • Krishnarathinam Kannan
  • Tenali Gnana Sagar
Original Article
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Abstract

Oral Metronomic chemotherapy (OMC) is used in patients with lymphoma who may not tolerate intravenous chemotherapy or have refractory disease. It is cheaper, less toxic and easy to administer. Adult patients with lymphoma who received OMC (combination of cyclophosphamide, etoposide and prednisolone) were included in this retrospective analysis. Response assessment was clinical with limited use of radiology. Progression free and overall survival (PFS and OS) were calculated from the time of start of OMC until documentation of disease progression or death. Between 2007 and 2017, 149 patients were given OMC [median age: 62 years (19–87); 94 patients (63.1%) male]. Majority [112 patients (75.2%)] had stage III/IV disease. The most common subtype of lymphoma was diffuse large B cell lymphoma (40.9%). OMC was used at diagnosis in 41 patients (27.5%) and after relapse in 108 patients (72.5%). Overall response rates were 43.9 and 41.7% with clinical CR in 14 (34.1%) and 21 (19.4%) in patients given first line and later lines of OMC respectively. After a median follow up of 12 months (range 1–123 months), median PFS and OS were 10.5 (95% CI 8.6–12.5) and 18.8 (95% CI 12.1–25.5) months respectively. PFS and OS at 12 months were 47.6 and 64.2% respectively. Though OMC is used in many centers in India, there is scanty published information on its efficacy in lymphoma. In this analysis, we demonstrate its activity in a subset of patients with predominantly high-grade and advanced stage NHL. OMC is a useful option in frail patients and a small proportion can achieve deep and long lasting responses.

Keywords

Oral metronomic chemotherapy Lymphoma Survival Diffuse large B cell lymphoma Outcomes 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Ms. Vanitha N for helping with collection of data.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society of Hematology and Blood Transfusion 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharada Mailankody
    • 1
  • Prasanth Ganesan
    • 1
  • Archit Joshi
    • 1
  • Trivadi S. Ganesan
    • 1
  • Venkatraman Radhakrishnan
    • 1
  • Manikandan Dhanushkodi
    • 1
  • Nikita Mehra
    • 1
  • Jayachandran Perumal Kalaiyarasi
    • 1
  • Krishnarathinam Kannan
    • 1
  • Tenali Gnana Sagar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical OncologyCancer Institute (WIA)ChennaiIndia

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