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Outcomes Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Using Non-sibling Family Donors

  • Anu Korula
  • Anup J. Devasia
  • N. A. Fouzia
  • P. N. Nisham
  • Uday Kulkarni
  • Kavitha M. Lakshmi
  • Aby Abraham
  • Alok Srivastava
  • Vikram Mathews
  • Biju GeorgeEmail author
Original Article
  • 15 Downloads

Abstract

For patients requiring allogeneic stem cell transplant, in the absence of a HLA-matched sibling, an extended donor search within the family may yield a suitable donor especially in societies with a high prevalence of consanguinity. We describe outcomes in transplants with non-sibling family donors, and compare outcomes with controls having a sibling donor transplant. Retrospective analysis of all matched related (non-sibling) donor transplants between 1995 and 2015. For comparison, appropriate age, sex and disease-matched patients were chosen from the sibling transplants (MSD) performed during the same time period (± 2 years). Comparison between the fully matched non-sibling donor cohort and age, sex and disease-matched sibling donor transplants showed a significant increase in complications in the family donor group (viral infections, acute GVHD and rejection). Event-free survival and overall survival were significantly lower in the non-sibling donor cohort, and HLA disparity (1–2 antigen) further worsened the adverse impact. Though there was a significantly lower event-free and overall survival at 3 years in the family donor cohort, this did not retain significance in the multivariate analysis. This data on allogeneic transplants using family donors showed higher complication rates and poorer outcomes. However in situations where financial constraints prevent access to matched unrelated donor sources, extended family searches may be fruitful in yielding a donor, and modifications in conditioning regimens and improvement in supportive care may help in improving the outcomes in family donor transplants.

Keywords

Family donor Allogeneic Transplant Non-sibling Outcome 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

This study was not funded and there are no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society of Hematology and Blood Transfusion 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anu Korula
    • 1
  • Anup J. Devasia
    • 1
  • N. A. Fouzia
    • 1
  • P. N. Nisham
    • 1
  • Uday Kulkarni
    • 1
  • Kavitha M. Lakshmi
    • 1
  • Aby Abraham
    • 1
  • Alok Srivastava
    • 1
  • Vikram Mathews
    • 1
  • Biju George
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of HaematologyChristian Medical College and HospitalVelloreIndia

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