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Journal of Microbiology

, Volume 57, Issue 2, pp 163–169 | Cite as

Efficacy of A/H1N1/2009 split inactivated influenza A vaccine (GC1115) in mice and ferrets

  • Hae Jung Han
  • Min-Suk Song
  • Su-Jin Park
  • Han Yeul Byun
  • Norbert John C. Robles
  • Suk-Hoon Ha
  • Young Ki ChoiEmail author
Virology
  • 15 Downloads

Abstract

To evaluate the efficacy of a non-adjuvant A/H1N1/2009 influenza A vaccine (GC1115), we demonstrated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of GC1115 in mouse and ferret models. The immunogenicity of GC1115 was confirmed after intramuscular administration of 1.875, 3.75, 7.5, and 15 μg hemagglutinin antigen (HA) in mice and 7.5, 15, and 30 μg HA in ferrets at 3-week intervals. A single immunization with GC1115 at HA doses > 7.5 μg induced detectable seroconversion in most mice, and all mice given a second dose exhibited high antibody responses in a dose-dependent manner. The mice in the mock (PBS) and 1.875 μg HA immunized groups succumbed by 13 days following A/California/ 04/09 infection, while all mice in groups given more than 3.75 μg HA were protected from lethal challenge with the A/California/04/09 virus. In ferrets, although immunization with even a single dose of 15 or 30 μg of HA induced detectable HI antibodies, all ferrets given two doses of vaccine seroconverted and exhibited HI titers greater than 80 units. Following challenge with A/California/04/09, the mock (PBS) immunized ferrets showed influenza-like clinical symptoms, such as increased numbers of coughs, elevated body temperature, and body weight loss, for 7 days, while GC1115- immunized ferrets showed attenuated clinical symptoms only for short time period (3–4 days). Further, GC1115-immunized ferrets displayed significantly lower viral titers in the upper respiratory tract (nasal cavity) than the mock vaccinated group in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, this study demonstrates the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of GC1115 as a non-adjuvanted vaccine.

Keywords

H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccination immunogenicity protective efficacy 

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Copyright information

© The Microbiological Society of Korea and Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hae Jung Han
    • 1
    • 2
  • Min-Suk Song
    • 1
  • Su-Jin Park
    • 1
  • Han Yeul Byun
    • 2
  • Norbert John C. Robles
    • 1
  • Suk-Hoon Ha
    • 2
  • Young Ki Choi
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.College of Medicine and Medical Research InstituteChungbuk National UniversityCheongjuRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Research & Development Center, GC Pharma.YonginRepublic of Korea

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