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Virologica Sinica

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 167–170 | Cite as

A novel phenotypic assay of hepatitis B virus polymerase with extensive site-specific mutagenesis

  • Ya Liu
  • Ying-Ying Luo
  • Xue-Fei Cai
  • Quan-Xin Long
  • Chun-Yang Gan
  • Liu-Qing Yang
  • Haitao Guo
  • Ai-Long Huang
  • Wen-Lu ZhangEmail author
  • Jie-Li HuEmail author
Letter
  • 51 Downloads

Dear Editor,

A common reason for drug failure during long-term treatment of chronic hepatitis B with nucleot(s)ide analogues (NUCs) is the emergence of drug resistance (Das et al., 2001). Most primary NUCs-resistant mutations identified in clinical samples have been limited to a minority of amino acids (usually less than three kinds) that replace the wild type amino acid at a single site (Kirishima et al., 2002). However, each site should, theoretically, have the same opportunity to be mutated to any of the 19 amino acids other than that of the wild type during the DNA synthesis catalyzed by the error-prone viral polymerase (Bartholomeusz et al., 2004). Therefore, precisely how these undiscovered possible mutations influence the viral phenotype is an interesting research question. To address this issue, Baldick et al.constructed a comprehensive panel of clones containing every possible amino acid at the three primary amino acid positions related to entecavir resistance (rtT184,...

Supplementary material

12250_2016_3932_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (114 kb)
A novel phenotypic assay of hepatitis B virus polymerase with extensive site-specific mutagenesis

References

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Copyright information

© Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS and Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ya Liu
    • 1
  • Ying-Ying Luo
    • 1
  • Xue-Fei Cai
    • 1
  • Quan-Xin Long
    • 1
  • Chun-Yang Gan
    • 1
  • Liu-Qing Yang
    • 1
  • Haitao Guo
    • 2
  • Ai-Long Huang
    • 1
    • 3
  • Wen-Lu Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jie-Li Hu
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.Institute for Viral Hepatitis, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology on Infectious Diseases, Ministry of Educationthe Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical UniversityChongqingChina
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyIndiana University School of MedicineIndianapolisUSA
  3. 3.Collaborative Innovation Center for diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases (CCID)HangzhouChina

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