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International Journal of Automotive Technology

, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp 127–135 | Cite as

Model-Based Control of Electromagnetic Valve Actuators for Engine Speed Control

  • Huitao Chen
  • Siqin ChangEmail author
  • Aimin Fan
Article
  • 1 Downloads

Abstract

The introduction of electromagnetic valve actuators (EMVA) benefits engine fuel economy, torque performance and reduction of emissions. Meanwhile, it complicates the controller for the purpose of regulating the additional freedom degrees of intake valvetrain, such as valve lift, opening timing and opening duration. In order to address the control issue of EMVA application, a model-based controller is needed to realize that the cylinder air charge is regulated by controlling the EMVA motion directly for controlling the engine speed and output torque. For the development of the controller, a control-oriented model of engine with EMVA that can simulate the intake process of unthrottled operation, torque generation and crankshaft rotational dynamics was first developed. Then a model-based EMVA controller was designed to regulate the actuation of electromagnetic intake valves which consisted of a feedforward and a PID feedback module. According to torque-based concept, engine speed reference was translated into torque demand using optimal control theory and the speed control problem was solved as two parts: torque management that decided torque demand and the torque demand tracking. The simulations carried out in Matlab/Simulink verified the effectiveness of the controller. In addition, a test platform of the EMVA for hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation was established and the practicability of EMVA application to engine intake systems was validated preliminarily.

Key words

Electromagnetic valve actuators Cylinder air charge Control-oriented model Torque control Speed control 

Nomenclature

Aeff

effective flow area of the orifice (m2)

cd

discharge coefficient

D

cylinder diameter (m)

Hu

fuel heating value (kJ/kg)

i

number of sampling cycle

I

moment of inertia (kg·m2)

k

the ratio of the specific heats for air

kp

proportional coefficient

L

intake valve lift (mm)

mc

desired cylinder air charge (kg)

c

simulation cylinder air charge (Kg)

c

air mass flow into cylinder (kg/sec)

mfuel

fuel mass (kg)

fuel

fuel mass flow (kg/sec)

n

engine speed (rpm)

simulation engine speed (rpm)

pc

cylinder pressure during intake process (Pascal)

pup

upstream pressure (Pascal)

Pi

indicated power (Watts)

R

gas constant

S

cylinder stroke (m)

Tc

cylinder air charge temperature (K)

Tup

upstream temperature (K)

Ti

indicated torque (N·m)

Tp

torque related to pumping losses (N·m)

Tf

torque related to frictional losses (N·m)

Te

engine effective output torque (N·m)

e

simulation engine effective output torque (N·m)

Tl

load torque (N·m)

TD

differential time constant

TI

integration time constant

Vc

cylinder volume (m3)

QL

energy loss (J)

α

crank angle (degrees)

β

weight factor

ε

compression ratio

λs

crank radius-connecting rod length ratio

ηi

indicated efficiency

ω

angular speed (rad/sec)

ω̂

simulation crankshaft angular speed (rad/sec)

Δt

sampling period

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society of Automotive Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringNanjing University of Science and TechnologyNanjingChina

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