Advertisement

Folia Microbiologica

, Volume 64, Issue 2, pp 257–264 | Cite as

Antiviral potentials of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and Enterococcus hirae against selected Enterovirus

  • Abidemi Anota Sunmola
  • Omonike O. OgboleEmail author
  • Temitope O. C. Faleye
  • Adewale Adetoye
  • Johnson A. Adeniji
  • Funmilola A. AyeniEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Enteroviruses have been associated with a host of clinical presentations including acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). The site of primary replication for most enteroviruses is the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may confer protection in the GIT against them. This study therefore investigates the antiviral potential of some selected lactic acid bacteria against enterovirus isolates recovered from AFP cases. The antiviral activities of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and Enterococcus hirae in broth culture, their cell-free supernatant (CFS), and bacterial cell pellets were assayed against Echovirus 7 (E7), E13, and E19 in a pre- and post-treatment approach using cytopathic effect (CPE) and cell viability (MTT) assay. The tested Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus amylovorus, and Enterococcus hirae strains have good antiviral properties against E7 and E19 but not against E13. Lactobacillus amylovorus AA099 shows the highest activity against E19. The pre-treatment approach displays better antiviral activities compared to post-treatment approach. The LAB in broth suspension have better antiviral activities than their corresponding CFS and bacterial pellet. Lactic acid bacteria used in this study have the potential as antiviral agents.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interests

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

12223_2018_648_MOESM1_ESM.jpg (149 kb)
Plate 1 CPE expressed after MTT assay. ACE represent cells for pre-treatment, BDF represents cells for post-treatment of E hirae; IKM represent cells for pre-treatment, JLN represents cells for post-treatment of L. amylovorus; QSU represent cells for pre-treatment, RTV represents cells for post-treatment of L. plantarum against E7. GOW are cell controls, HPX are virus controls (JPG 149 kb)
12223_2018_648_MOESM2_ESM.jpg (145 kb)
Plate 2 CPE expressed after MTT assay. ACE represent cells for pre-treatment, BDF represents cells for post-treatment of E hirae; IKM represent cells for pre-treatment, JLN represents cells for post-treatment of L. amylovorus; QSU represent cells for pre-treatment, RTV represents cells for post-treatment of L. plantarum against E13. GOW are cell controls, HPX are virus controls (JPG 144 kb)
12223_2018_648_MOESM3_ESM.jpg (206 kb)
Plate 3 CPE expressed after MTT assay. ACE represent cells for pre-treatment, BDF represents cells for post-treatment of E hirae; IKM represent cells for pre-treatment, JLN represents cells for post-treatment of L. amylovorus; QSU represent cells for pre-treatment, RTV represents cells for post-treatment of L. plantarum against E19. GOW are cell controls, HPX are virus controls (JPG 206 kb)

References

  1. Adeniyi BA, Ayeni FA, Ogunbanwo ST (2006) Antagonistic activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Nigerian fermented dairy foods against organisms implicated in urinary tract infection. Biotechnology 5:183–188CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Afolayan AO, Ayeni FA (2017) Antagonistic effects of three lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from Nigerian indigenous fermented Ogi on E. coli EKT004 in co-culture. Acta Aliment Hung 46:1–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Afolayan AO, Ayeni FA, Ruppitsch W (2017) Antagonistic and quantitative assessment of indigenous lactic acid bacteria in different varieties of Ogi against gastrointestinal pathogens. Pan Afr Med J 27:22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Alebiosu KM, Adetoye A, Ayeni FA (2017) Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia vermicola, Alcaligenes faecalis and methicillin resistant S. aureus. West Afric J Pharm 28:132–142Google Scholar
  5. Ang LYE, KhitIssac HT, Tan EL, Chow TV, Shek PL, Tham E, Alonso S (2016) Antiviral activity of Lactobacillus reuteri protects against Coxsackievirus A and Enterovirus 71 infection in human skeletal muscle and colon cell lines. Virol J 13:111CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Ayeni FA, Adeniyi BA, Ogunbanwo ST, Tabasco R, PaarupT PC, Requena T (2009) Inhibition of uropathogens by lactic acid bacteria isolated from dairy foods and cow’s intestine in western Nigeria. Arch Microbiol 191:639–648CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ayeni FA, Sánchez B, Adeniyi BA, de los Reyes-Gavilán CG, Margolles A, Ruas-Madiedo P (2011) Evaluation of the functional potential of Weissella and Lactobacillus isolates obtained from Nigerian traditional fermented foods and cow’s intestine. Int J Food Microbiol 147:97–104CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bikila W (2015) Lactic acid bacteria: benefits, selection criteria and probiotic potential in fermented food. J Prob Health 3:129Google Scholar
  9. Choi H, Song J, Park K, Baek S, Lee E, Kwon D (2010) Antiviral activity of yogurt against enterovirus 71 in vero cells. Food Sci Biotechnol 19:289–295CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Conti C, Malaciino C, Mastromarino P (2009) Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 2 by vaginal Lactobacilli. J Physiol Pharmacol 60:19–26Google Scholar
  11. Falana MB, Bankole MO, Omemu AM, Oyewole OB (2012) Antimicrobial potentials of some selected microorganisms associated with supernatant solution of fermented maize mash Omidun. Afr J Microbiol Res 6:4095–4101CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Falana MB, Bankole MO, Omemu AM (2016) Comparative antimicrobial potentials of omidun obtained from yellow and white maize varieties on some diarrhoea causing microorganisms. Afr J Microbiol Res 10:1018–1023CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Faleye TOC, Adewumi MO, Japhet MO, David OM, Oluyege AO, Adeniji JA, Famurewa O (2017) Non-polio enteroviruses in faeces of children diagnosed with acute flaccid paralysis in Nigeria. BMC Virology J 14:175CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Khani S, Motamedifar M, Golmoghaddam H, Hosseini HM, Hashemizadeh Z (2012) In vitro study of the effect of a probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus against herpes simplex virus type 1. Braz J Infect Dis 16:129–135Google Scholar
  15. Leary JJ, Wittrock R, Sarisky RT (2002) Susceptibilities of herpes simplex viruses to penciclovir and acyclovir in eight cell lines. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 46:762–768CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Mercenier A, Pavan S, Pot B (2002) Probiotics as biotherapeutic agents: present knowledge and future prospects. Curr Pharml Des 8:99–110CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pant N, Marcotte H, Brüssow H, Svensson L, Hammarström L (2007) Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies. BMC Microbiol 7:86CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Sayyed MHG, Mahboobeh MN Mahdi G, Zohreh K (2013) Probiotic therapy, what is the most effective method for host protection against enteric pathogen. Int J Entric Pathog 1:36–42Google Scholar
  19. Sirichokchatchawan W, Temeeyasen G, Nilubol D, Prapasarakul N (2018) Protective effects of cell-free supernatant and live lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai pigs against a pandemic strain of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus. Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 10:383–390CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Sobol CV, Bichurina MA (2009) Antiviral activity of Newfood probiotic product invitro. Int J Probiotics Prebiotics 4:229–232Google Scholar
  21. Tan CYQ, Ninove L, Gaudart J, Nougairede A, Zandotti C (2011) A retrospective overview of enterovirus infection diagnosis and molecular epidemiology in the public hospitals of Marseille, France (1985–2005). PLoS One 6:e18022CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Tapparel C, Siegrist F, Petty TJ, Kaiser L (2013) Picornavirus and enterovirus diversity with associated human disease. Infect Genet Evol 12:505–521Google Scholar
  23. Vincenti JE (2010) The influence of cell-free Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant on the phagocytic activity of macrophages. Biohorizons 3:105–112Google Scholar
  24. World Health Organisation. Polio laboratory manual. 2004, 4th Edition, GenevaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute of Microbiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of IbadanIbadanNigeria
  2. 2.Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of PharmacyUniversity of IbadanIbadanNigeria
  3. 3.Department of Virology, University College HospitalUniversity of IbadanIbadanNigeria

Personalised recommendations