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Fibers and Polymers

, Volume 20, Issue 10, pp 2215–2221 | Cite as

Effect of Blend Ratio of Deep-Grooved Polyester/Cotton Fibers on Mechanical and Comfort Properties of Woven Fabrics

  • Kiday Fiseha
  • Dipayan Das
  • N. K. PalaniswamyEmail author
Article
  • 10 Downloads

Abstract

This work deals with plain woven fabrics prepared from deep-grooved (4DG) polyester and cotton blends and, circular polyester and cotton blend. The fabrics were tested for tensile strength, breaking elongation, air permeability, moisture vapour transmission rate, thermal resistance, wicking and tactile properties. Tensile strength of the fabrics first decreases and then increases with increase in weight proportion of 4DG polyester fibres in the blend. Breaking elongation, air permeability, moisture vapour transmission rate, wicking, thermal resistance and total hand value of the fabrics increase with increase of weight proportion of 4DG polyester fibres in the blend. The fabrics prepared from 100 % 4DG polyester fibres provide the highest air permeability, water vapour transmission rate, wicking and thermal resistance.

Keywords

Deep-grooved polyester Wicking Fabric transmissibility Fabric handle Kawabata evaluation system 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Fiber Society 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Textile EngineeringAksum UniversityAxumEthiopia
  2. 2.Department of Textile TechnologyIndian Institute of Technology DelhiNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.Department of Textile TechnologyDr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of TechnologyJalandhar, PunjabIndia

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