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KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering

, Volume 23, Issue 9, pp 4075–4084 | Cite as

Coupling Vibration between Wind-Induced Internal Pressure and a Flexible Roof for Buildings with a Dominant Opening and Background Leakage

  • Xianfeng Yu
  • Zhuangning Xie
  • Ming GuEmail author
Structural Engineering
  • 11 Downloads

Abstract

After considering the combination of internal pressure and external pressure acting on the roof, the coupling dynamic equations to describe the relationship between wind-induced internal pressure and flexible roof are reviewed and further refined. The internal pressure responses and the first order modal response of a flexible roof can be evaluated by the coupling equations. Wind tunnel test was carried out on an aeroelastic roof model which was treated as a single-degree-of-freedom system. Three factors, approaching wind velocities at the center of the dominant opening, acceleration responses at dominant opening areas and background leakages, which have effects on roof acceleration responses were studied. On this basis, the effectiveness and calculation precision of the coupling equations were verified. Results show that the root-mean-square (RMS) value of roof acceleration increases with the increase of the approaching wind velocity and dominant opening area, and in background leakage decreases. Meanwhile, theoretical calculation values of RMS internal pressure and RMS acceleration response corresponding to the first order modal of flexible roof agree well with the wind tunnel experimental data.

Keywords

internal pressure flexible roof coupling vibration wind tunnel experiment dominant opening background leakage 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The work described in this paper is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51778243), and the State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Building Science, South China University of Technology (No. 2019ZB28). The financial supports are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Korean Society of Civil Engineers 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Subtropical Building ScienceSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Disaster Reduction in Civil EngineeringTongji UniversityShanghaiChina

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