Advertisement

Analyzing the Influence of Aggregate Properties on Stopping Distance on Truck Escape Ramps

  • Pinpin Qin (覃频频)Email author
  • Chuice Chen (陈垂策)
  • Huanliang Guo (郭焕亮)
  • Yaqi Han (韩亚奇)
  • Qiang Meng (孟 强)
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

Although there are many studies involving influence of runaway truck entry speed and longitudinal grade on stopping distance, focusing on aggregate properties is scarce. This paper investigates the influence of the aggregate properties such as types of aggregate and river gravel radius on stopping distance through numerical analysis of particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC2D). The software is used to generate stopping distance data for two aggregate types and four group gravel radii under various approaching speeds and grades. The generated data are compared with the testing results of full-scale arrester bed. The simulated finding of this paper implies that types of aggregates and river gravel radii have a significant impact on the stopping distance for runaway truck on escape ramps.

Key words

truck escape ramp stopping distance particle flow code in two dimensions (PFC2D) aggregate property 

CLC number

U 418 

Document code

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [1]
    ECK R W. Development of warrants for the use and location of truck escape ramps. Volume I: Final report [R]. Morgantown, USA: West Virgina University, 1980.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    ECK R W. Development of warrants for the use and location of truck escape ramps. Volume II: Appendices [R]. Morgantown, USA: West Virgina University, 1980.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    OUTCALT W. Evaluation of truck arrester beds in Colorado [R]. Denver, USA: Colorado Department of Transportation, 2008.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    ZHANG J J, ZHANG G Q. Analysis of incidents in emergency escape ramps and legal risk aversion [C]//Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Transportation Engineering. Chengdu, China: ICTE, 2013: 706–715.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    WASHNOCK R J. The design of a facility and the testing methodology to measure the drag on a rolling tire through gravel [D]. State College, USA: Mechanical Engineering Department, the Pennsylvania State University, 1984.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). A policy on geometric design of highway and streets: GDSH-6-E1 [S]. Washington, USA: AASHTO, 2013.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    LIN D Y. Study on the design of truck escape ramps of Fu-yin expressway in long downhill section [J]. Fujian Jiaotong Keji, 2016(3): 107–109 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    MENG Z H. Design method of truck escape ramps of mountainous expressway [J]. Journal of Highway and Transportation Research and Development (Application Technical Edition), 2016, 12(5): 304–306 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    YUAN Z Y. The study on length of emergency escape ramp in mountain road [D]. Xi’an, China: College of Highway, Chang’an University, 2006 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    QIAN Y S, ZHOU B, CHENG Y H, et al. Mechanism and experimental analysis of a class of decelerating downhill lanes [J]. Journal of China & Foreign Highway, 2007, 27(4): 5–8 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    YANG Y Z. Study on aggregate resistance coefficient of emergency escape ramp [J]. Transport Engineering, 2015(8): 86–88 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    WAMBOLD J C. Truck escape ramp design methodology. Volume I: Executive Summary [R]. State College, USA: The Pennsylvania State University, 1988.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    WAMBOLD J C, RIVERA-ORTIZ L A, WANG M C, et al. A field and laboratory study to establish truck escape ramp design methodology. Volume II [R]. State College, USA: The Pennsylvania State University, 1988.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    AL-QADI I L, RIVERA-ORTIZ L A. Laboratory testing of river gravel used in arrester beds [J]. Journal of Testing and Materials, 1991, 19(4): 280–291.Google Scholar
  15. [15]
    AL-QADI I L, RIVERA-ORTIZ L A. Use of gravel properties to develop arrester bed stopping model [J]. Journal of Transportation Engineering, 1991, 117(5): 566–584.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [16]
    ITASCA Consulting Group. PFC Theory and background (online manual table of contents) [R]. Minnesota, USA: ITASCA, 2014.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    The Arizona Department of Transportation. Full-scale arrester bed testing leads to more cost-effective design [J]. Transportation Research News, 1993, 166: 20–21.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    TRITSCH S L. A review of truck escape ramps for HPR-PL-1(31)280: Evaluation of arrester bed performance [R]. Phoenix, USA: Arizona Department of Transportation, 1987.Google Scholar
  19. [19]
    BEKKER M G. Introduction to terrain-vehicle systems [M]. Michigan, USA: The University of Michigan Press, 1969.Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    WILLIAMS E C. Emergency escape ramps for runaway heavy vehicles (EERRHV): Final report [R]. Michigan, USA: The University of Michigan, 1978.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pinpin Qin (覃频频)
    • 1
    Email author
  • Chuice Chen (陈垂策)
    • 2
  • Huanliang Guo (郭焕亮)
    • 1
  • Yaqi Han (韩亚奇)
    • 1
  • Qiang Meng (孟 强)
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Mechanical EngineeringGuangxi UniversityNanningChina
  2. 2.School of Automotive EngineeringHainan Technology and Business CollegeHaikouChina
  3. 3.College of Automotive EngineeringJilin UniversityChangchunChina

Personalised recommendations