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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 110, Issue 6, pp 723–728 | Cite as

Successful outcome with reduced-intensity condition regimen followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed or refractory anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

  • Reiji FukanoEmail author
  • Tetsuya Mori
  • Naoto Fujita
  • Ryoji Kobayashi
  • Tetsuo Mitsui
  • Koji Kato
  • Ritsuro Suzuki
  • Junji Suzumiya
  • Takahiro Fukuda
  • Motohiro Shindo
  • Nobuo Maseki
  • Tatsu Shimoyama
  • Keiko Okada
  • Masami Inoue
  • Jiro Inagaki
  • Yoshiko Hashii
  • Atsushi Sato
  • Ken Tabuchi
Original Article

Abstract

We report a retrospective analysis of 38 patients (age ≤ 30 years) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) for relapsed or refractory anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Median follow-up for survivors after undergoing allo-SCT was 72 months (range, 35–96 months). Eight patients received reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens, including three patients with fludarabine plus melphalan-based regimens and five patients with fludarabine plus busulfan-based regimens. The remaining 30 patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimens. Median ages in the RIC and MAC groups were 24 and 15 years, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates in the RIC and MAC groups were 100% and 49%, respectively (P = 0.018). The 5-year event-free survival rates in the RIC and MAC groups were 88% and 43%, respectively (P = 0.039). In the RIC group, four of the eight patients showed residual disease at allo-SCT, but all eight patients survived with complete remission (CR), including one patient with relapse. This result suggests that allo-SCT using the RIC regimen may be effective for relapsed or refractory ALCL in children, adolescents, and young adults, even in non-CR cases.

Keywords

Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation Reduced-intensity conditioning Children Young adults 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank each of the clinicians, hospital administrators, and health center administrators who provided precise data via the registry of the Japan Society for Stem Cell Transplantation. We also wish to thank Yuki Yamashita for supporting the data analysis.

Author contributions

NF, TM, RK, TM, KK, RS, JS, and RF designed the research study; TF, MS, NM, TS, KO, MI, JI, YK, JI, YH, AS, and KT collected the data; RS and RF analyzed the data; and RF wrote the paper. All authors reviewed the manuscript.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

R. Suzuki reports personal fees from Bristol-Meyer Squib, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Kyowa-Hakko Kirin, Chugai Pharmaceutical, Shionogi, Takeda Pharmaceutical, Meiji Seika Pharma, MSD, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Sawai, Celgene, Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma, Eisai Pharmaceuticals, Alexion Pharma, Sano, Gilead Sciences, Abbvie Inc., Mundi Pharma, Jazz Pharma, Ono Pharmaceutical, and Janssen Pharmaceuticals, outside the submitted work. The other authors declare no relevant conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Hematology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reiji Fukano
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Tetsuya Mori
    • 3
  • Naoto Fujita
    • 4
  • Ryoji Kobayashi
    • 5
  • Tetsuo Mitsui
    • 6
  • Koji Kato
    • 7
  • Ritsuro Suzuki
    • 8
  • Junji Suzumiya
    • 8
  • Takahiro Fukuda
    • 9
  • Motohiro Shindo
    • 10
  • Nobuo Maseki
    • 11
  • Tatsu Shimoyama
    • 12
  • Keiko Okada
    • 13
  • Masami Inoue
    • 14
  • Jiro Inagaki
    • 1
  • Yoshiko Hashii
    • 15
  • Atsushi Sato
    • 16
  • Ken Tabuchi
    • 17
  1. 1.Department of PediatricsNational Kyushu Cancer CenterFukuokaJapan
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsYamaguchi University Graduate School of MedicineUbeJapan
  3. 3.Department of PediatricsSt. Marianna University School of MedicineKawasakiJapan
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsHiroshima Red Cross Hospital and Atomic-bomb Survivors HospitalHiroshimaJapan
  5. 5.Department of PediatricsSapporo Hokuyu HospitalSapporoJapan
  6. 6.Department of PediatricsYamagata University HospitalYamagataJapan
  7. 7.Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu University Graduate School of MedicineFukuokaJapan
  8. 8.Department of Oncology/HematologyShimane University HospitalIzumoJapan
  9. 9.Department of Hematopoietic Stem Cell TransplantationNational Cancer Center HospitalTokyoJapan
  10. 10.Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology Department of MedicineAsahikawa Medical UniversityAsahikawaJapan
  11. 11.Department of HematologySaitama Cancer CenterInaJapan
  12. 12.Department of Medical OncologyTokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome HospitalTokyoJapan
  13. 13.Department of Pediatric Hematology/OncologyOsaka City General HospitalOsakaJapan
  14. 14.Department of Hematology/OncologyOsaka Women’s and Children’s HospitalIzumiJapan
  15. 15.Department of PediatricsOsaka University Graduate School of MedicineSuitaJapan
  16. 16.Department of Hematology and OncologyMiyagi Children’s HospitalSendaiJapan
  17. 17.Division of PediatricsTokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome HospitalTokyoJapan

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