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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 110, Issue 1, pp 69–76 | Cite as

Expression analysis of two SLAM family receptors, SLAMF2 and SLAMF7, in patients with multiple myeloma

  • Reham Ashour
  • Masaki RiEmail author
  • Sanaa Shaker Aly
  • Takashi Yoshida
  • Takuto Tachita
  • Takashi Kanamori
  • Sho Aoki
  • Shiori Kinoshita
  • Tomoko Narita
  • Haruhito Totani
  • Ayako Masaki
  • Asahi Ito
  • Shigeru Kusumoto
  • Hirokazu Komatsu
  • Samar Mansour
  • Abdelrahman A. Elsaied
  • Shinsuke Iida
Original Article
  • 124 Downloads

Abstract

Monoclonal antibodies against surface antigens on MM cells, such as anti-SLAMF7 and anti-CD38 antibodies, represent an attractive therapeutic modality for the eradication of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. However, further exploration of target molecules is urgently needed for the development of more effective therapies. In the present study, we studied the expression of CD48 in a total of 74 primary MM samples derived from patients to evaluate SLAMF2 (CD48) as a candidate in mAb therapy for MM. Of 74 samples, 39 were subjected to SLAMF7 analysis. Most of the MM cells, defined as CD38 and CD138 double-positive cells, showed strong expression of CD48 or SLAMF7 independent of disease stage or treatment history. In these 39 samples, most MM cells showed expression of both SLAMF7 and CD48; however, several samples showed expression of either only CD48 or only SLAMF7, including seven cases that were only highly positive for SLAMF7, and five that were only highly positive for CD48. Our study demonstrates that the immune receptor CD48 is overexpressed on MM cells together with SLAMF7, and that CD48 may be considered as an alternative target for treatment of MM in cases showing weak expression of SLAMF7.

Keywords

CD48 SLAMF Multiple myeloma Flow cytometry 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Ms. Chiori Fukuyama for her skillful technical assistance. The study received financial support from Bristol-Myers Squibb. We acknowledge the support of the Egyptian Ministry of Higher Education (Cultural Affairs Sector and Missions). This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (16K07179 & 16K09855), the National Cancer Center Research and Development Fund (26-A-4), and the Practical Research for Innovative Cancer Control from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED (15ck0106077h0002).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

MR received research funding from Celgene Co., Ltd. SI received research funding and declares Honoraria from Janssen Pharmaceutical K.K., and Celgene Co., Ltd. SI also received research funding from Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd., Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Takeda Yakuhin Co., Ltd., and Ono Pharmaceutical CO., Ltd.

Supplementary material

12185_2019_2649_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (122 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 122 kb)

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Hematology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reham Ashour
    • 1
    • 2
  • Masaki Ri
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  • Sanaa Shaker Aly
    • 2
  • Takashi Yoshida
    • 1
  • Takuto Tachita
    • 1
    • 5
  • Takashi Kanamori
    • 1
  • Sho Aoki
    • 1
  • Shiori Kinoshita
    • 1
  • Tomoko Narita
    • 1
  • Haruhito Totani
    • 1
  • Ayako Masaki
    • 1
  • Asahi Ito
    • 1
  • Shigeru Kusumoto
    • 1
  • Hirokazu Komatsu
    • 1
  • Samar Mansour
    • 4
  • Abdelrahman A. Elsaied
    • 2
  • Shinsuke Iida
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Blood Transfusion, Department of Hematology and OncologyNagoya City University Graduate School of Medical SciencesNagoyaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Pathology, Qena University HospitalSouth Valley UniversityQenaEgypt
  3. 3.Division of Blood TransfusionNagoya City University Graduate School of Medical SciencesNagoyaJapan
  4. 4.Clinical Pathology Department, South Egypt Cancer InstituteAssiut UniversityAssiutEgypt
  5. 5.Department of Gastroenterology and HematologyHirosaki University Graduate School of MedicineHirosakiJapan

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