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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 109, Issue 1, pp 5–17 | Cite as

Oncogenic transcriptional program driven by TAL1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

  • Tze King Tan
  • Chujing Zhang
  • Takaomi Sanda
Progress in Hematology Molecular pathogenesis of leukemia and stem cells
  • 161 Downloads

Abstract

TAL1/SCL is a prime example of an oncogenic transcription factor that is abnormally expressed in acute leukemia due to the replacement of regulator elements. This gene has also been recognized as an essential regulator of hematopoiesis. TAL1 expression is strictly regulated in a lineage- and stage-specific manner. Such precise control is crucial for the switching of the transcriptional program. The misexpression of TAL1 in immature thymocytes leads to a widespread series of orchestrated downstream events that affect several different cellular machineries, resulting in a lethal consequence, namely T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In this article, we will discuss the transcriptional regulatory network and downstream target genes, including protein-coding genes and non-coding RNAs, controlled by TAL1 in normal hematopoiesis and T-cell leukemogenesis.

Keywords

TAL1 T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Transcription factor 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the members of Sanda laboratory for their discussions and critical reviews. This research is supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF) and the Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) under its Research Centres of Excellence initiative. T. S. is also supported by the NRF under its Competitive Research Programme (NRF-NRFF2013-02); the National Medical Research Council, Ministry of Health, Clinician Scientists Individual Research Grant (NMRC/CIRG/1443/2016); the RNA Biology Center at CSI Singapore, NUS, from funding by the Singapore MOE’s Tier 3 Grant (MOE2014-T3-1-006); and the US National Cancer Institute (1K99CA157951).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, Centre for Translational MedicineSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.Department of MedicineYong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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