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Event-Specific Qualitative and Quantitative Detection of Genetically Modified Rice G6H1

  • Xiaoli Xu
  • Xiaoyun Chen
  • Yongmin Lai
  • Qing Zhang
  • Yuhua Wu
  • Jun Li
  • Cheng Peng
  • Xiaofu Wang
  • Qingmei Miao
  • Hui Liu
  • Junfeng Xu
Article
  • 13 Downloads

Abstract

The genetically modified rice G6H1 expressing a fused protein of Cry1Ab/Vip3H and a 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) G6 is a genetically modified event that has been approved for preproduction field testing in China. The purpose of this study was to establish an event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection method that could provide a stable, reliable system for monitoring this new transgenic event. In this study, event-specific qualitative and quantitative detection methods based on the 3′ integration junction sequence between host plant DNA and the integrated gene were developed. The limit of detection (LOD) of qualitative PCR was assessed to be 0.1%. The LOD of quantitative PCR was estimated to be ten haploid genome copies. The quantitative PCR detection method was verified with three mixed rice samples with known G6H1 contents, and the results agreed with the expected values. Evaluation of specificity and sensitivity indicated that the developed qualitative and quantitative PCR methods are reliable and can be used for the detection and quantification of G6H1.

Keywords

Genetically modified organism G6H1 rice Event-specific method Real-time PCR 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We greatly thank Shen Zhicheng of Zhejiang University for providing the seeds of the G6H1 event and non-transgenic rice Xiushui 110.

Funding

This work was financially supported by the National Transgenic Plant Special Fund (2014ZX08012-001) and a grant from Public Technology Application Research of Zhejiang Province (LGN18C200029).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Xiaoli Xu declares that she has no conflict of interest. Xiaoyun Chen declares that she has no conflict of interest. Yongmin Lai declares that he has no conflict of interest. Qing Zhang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Yuhua Wu declares that she has no conflict of interest. Jun Li declares that he has no conflict of interest. Cheng Peng declares that he has no conflict of interest. Xiaofu Wang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Qingmei Miao declares that she has no conflict of interest. Hui Liu declares that she has no conflict of interest. Junfeng Xu declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Not applicable

Supplementary material

12161_2018_1375_MOESM1_ESM.docx (16 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 15 kb)
12161_2018_1375_MOESM2_ESM.docx (315 kb)
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoli Xu
    • 1
  • Xiaoyun Chen
    • 1
  • Yongmin Lai
    • 1
  • Qing Zhang
    • 2
  • Yuhua Wu
    • 3
  • Jun Li
    • 3
  • Cheng Peng
    • 1
  • Xiaofu Wang
    • 1
  • Qingmei Miao
    • 1
  • Hui Liu
    • 1
  • Junfeng Xu
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory Breeding Base for Zhejiang Sustainable Pest and Disease ControlZhejiang Academy of Agricultural SciencesHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Planting Management Station of Ningbo CityNingboChina
  3. 3.Oil Crops Research InstituteChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesWuhanChina

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