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Annals of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 32–38 | Cite as

The significant value of predicting prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer using 18F-FDG PET metabolic parameters of primary tumors and hematological parameters

  • Junyan Xu
  • Yi Li
  • Silong HuEmail author
  • Linjun Lu
  • Zhiqi Gao
  • Huiyu Yuan
Original Article

Abstract

Objects

The purpose was to evaluate the correlation of the pre-treatment hematological parameters with metabolic parameters of primary tumor in baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and estimate the prognostic value of both.

Methods

We retrospectively investigated 231 patients with CRC who underwent baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT. Routine blood sampling was tested in the same term. PET parameters in term of hematological parameters and pathological characteristics of primary tumor were compared. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis was performed in the patients without distant metastasis. The differences of disease-free survival between groups were compared by log-rank tests.

Results

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) were significantly correlated with all the metabolic parameters including maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and tumor lesion glycolysis (TLG). The patients with NLR > 3 had higher MTV (24.82 ± 18.16 vs 19.06 ± 13.30, P = 0.039) and TLG (219.04 ± 186.94 vs 166.45 ± 146.39, P = 0.047) than those whose NLR ≤ 3. NLR in those patients with distant metastasis was significantly higher than those without distant metastasis (P = 0.018) while LMR in those patients with distant metastasis was significantly lower than those without distant metastasis (P = 0.032). Survival analysis showed that those patients with low MTV (P = 0.015), low NLR (P = 0.008) and high LMR (P = 0.027) revealed significant survival benefit.

Conclusions

There was a significant association between the pre-treatment hematological parameters and metabolic parameters of baseline 18F-FDG PET/CT in the patients with CRC. It might be helpful in those patients with high NLR and low LMR to undergo 18F-FDG PET/CT to detect distant metastasis and predict prognosis.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer PET NLR LMR Prognosis 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junyan Xu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Yi Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Silong Hu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
    Email author
  • Linjun Lu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Zhiqi Gao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Huiyu Yuan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineFudan University Shanghai Cancer CenterShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Center for Biomedical ImagingFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Molecular Imaging ProbesFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical CollegeFudan UniversityShanghaiChina
  5. 5.Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Ion-beam Application (MOE)Fudan UniversityShanghaiChina

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