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The Nature and Moral Status of Manipulation

  • Radim BělohradEmail author
Article

Abstract

The paper focuses on the nature and moral status of manipulation. I analyse a popular account of manipulation by Robert Noggle and assess a challenge that has been posed by Moti Gorin. I argue that Noggle’s theory can fend off the challenge. The analysis is instructive in that it enables one to look more closely at the nature of manipulation. I argue, contrary to some proposed accounts, that manipulation essentially involves deception about the manipulator’s intentions. Secondly, since manipulation contains an element of deception, it is, I maintain, prima facie immoral. Finally, I analyse and explain away several examples of allegedly morally non-problematic manipulation.

Keywords

Deception Intention Manipulation Ulterior motive 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The author declares that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, Faculty of ArtsMasaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic

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