Advertisement

Ageing International

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 250–261 | Cite as

Social Participation of British Patients Aged Sixty Five Years and Over Living in Kyrenia: a Descriptive Study Based on a Number of Activities

  • Ozen AsutEmail author
  • Songul Vaizoglu
  • Nur Alshanableh
  • Inaam Raed
  • Osman Cihan Tuna
  • Ozgur Turk
  • Sanda Cali
Article
  • 44 Downloads

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the social participation features of mostly British patients aged ≥65 years admitted to a university hospital in Northern Cyprus. The data of this descriptive study were collected by a questionnaire, analysed by SPSS 18.0 statistical program and subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Complete dependency in performing daily activities was expressed by 5% or less of the patients. The age group >70 years needed more assistance and the comparison of the age groups revealed a significant difference in favor of the ≤70 age group, with activities declining seriously >70. The higher the educational status, the more participants tend to perform social activities. The results show that most of the social activities decline seriously by age. University education was influential positively on level of social activities and independency. Measures to facilitate social participation of aging people are needed in Northern Cyprus.

Keywords

Aging Social participation Life quality in aging Life quality and health Chronic diseases Kyrenia Northern Cyprus Education 

Notes

Limitations

This is a descriptive study, giving only clues for the social participation of only 189 British people aged 65 years and over, living in Cyprus. No valid measurement scale was used for the assessment of social activities and social participation. The social participation of the participants was evaluated descriptively according to only age, sex and educational status.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

The manuscript has been read and approved by all the authors. All of the authors have contributed to the study in accordance with the guides of the Council of Science Editors (CSE) and International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE).

Ethical Treatment of Experimental Subjects (Animal and Human)

The survey was conducted after the permission of the Deanery of the Near East University (NEU) Faculty of Medicine and the approval of the NEU Scientific Research Ethics Committee (Report dated 23.03.2017, No.2017/45, Project no: 382). The questionnaires were anonymous. All procedures performed involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and national research committees and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

References

  1. Adamson, J., Lawler, D. A., & Ebrahim, S. (2004). Chronic diseases, locomotor activity limitation and social participation in older women: Cross sectional survey of british women's heart and health study. Age and Ageing, 33(3), 293–298.  https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afh090. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15082436 Accessed 9 Aug 2017.
  2. Andrew, P. (2015). Social media usage: 2005-2015. Pew Research Center, October 8 2015. Available at: http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/10/08/social-networking-usage-2005-2015. Accessed 7 Sept 2017.
  3. Asut, O., Vaizoglu, S. A., Bozyel, F., Sucuoğlu, A., Pektekin, C., Asif, G., et al. (2018). Social participation of people aged sixty five years and over living in a region of Nicosia (unpublished article accepted for publication on 08.01.2018 for Cukurova Medical Journal. (ISSN:2602-3032 - eISSN:2602-3040).Google Scholar
  4. Balci, E. (2012). Physical activity and the elderly. In: D. Aslan, M. Ertem (Eds.), Elderly health: Problems and solutions (pp. 48-53). Ankara: Association of Public Health Specialists Turkey, Publication No: 2012-1. (in Turkish).Google Scholar
  5. Baran, E., Ozvaris, S.B. (2012). Health promotion in aging. In: D. Aslan, M. Ertem (Eds.), Elderly health: Problems and solutions (pp. 31-36). Ankara: Association of Public Health Specialists Turkey, Publication No: 2012-1. (in Turkish).Google Scholar
  6. Cachadinha, C., Pedro, J. B., & Fialho, J. C. (2011). Social participation of community living older persons: Importance, determinants and opportunities. Conference Paper, 6th International Conference on the Role of Inclusive Design in Making Social Innovation Happen 18-20 April 2011. London: Helen Hamlyn Centre for Design. ISBN: 978-1-907342-29-5. Available at: https://repository.tudelft.nl/islandora/object/uuid:43c6504b-4cbe-4f01-8918-0b428cebbfbb. Accessed 4 Aug 2017.
  7. Camur, D., & Vaizoglu, S. A. (2012). Environment for healthy aging. In: D. Aslan, M. Ertem (Eds.), Elderly health: Problems and solutions (pp. 37-42). Ankara: Association of Public Health Specialists Turkey, Publication No: 2012-1. (in Turkish).Google Scholar
  8. Carla de Castro, V., & Carreira, L. (2015). Leisure activities and attitude of institutionalized elderly people: A basis for nursing practice. Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem, 23(2), 307–314.  https://doi.org/10.1590/0104-1169.3650.2556. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4459005/ Accessed 7 Sept 2017.
  9. Glass, T. A., Leon, C. M., Marottoli, R. A., & Berkman, L. F. (1999). Population based study of social and productive activities as predictors of survival among elderly Americans. BMJ, 319(7208), 478–483. Available at: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10454399 Accessed 7 Sept 2017.
  10. Halaweh, H., & Svantesson, U., & Willén, C. (2016). Experiences of habitual physical activity in maintaining roles and functioning among older adults: A qualitative study. Hindawi Publishing Corporation Rehabilitation Research and Practice. Article ID 14595977. Available at: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/rerp/2016/1459597/. Accessed 7 Sept 2017.
  11. Healthy aging in Canada: A new vision, a vital investment (2017). A discussion brief prepared for the federal, provincial and territorial committee of officials (seniors). Available at: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/seniors-aines/alt-formats/pdf/publications/public/healthy- sante/vision/vision-eng.pdf. Accessed 23 Aug 2017.
  12. Kutsal, Y. G. (2007). Aging people of the aging world. In Y. G. Kutsal (Ed.), Quality of life in aging (pp. 15–26). Ankara: Hacettepe University GEBAM Publications (in Turkish).Google Scholar
  13. McKenzie, T., & Pharoah, C. (2012). How generous is the UK? Centre of Charitable Giving and Philanthropy. Available at: http://www.cgap.org.uk/uploads/Briefing%20Papers/CGAP%20BN7%20How%20generous%20is%20the%20UK.pdf: Charitable giving in the context of household spending Accessed 7 Sept 2017.
  14. Pinto, J. M., & Neri, A. L. (2017). Trajectories of social participation in old age: A systematic literature review. Rev Bras Geriatr Gerontol, 20(2), 259–272. Available at: http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rbgg/v20n2/1809-9823-rbgg-20-02-00259.pdf Accessed 3 Jan 2018.
  15. Rainer, S. (2014). Social participation and social engagement of elderly people. 5th world conference on educational sciences - WCES 2013. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 116, 780–785. Available at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042814003140 Accessed 4 Aug 2017.
  16. Saygun, M., & Eser, E. (2012). The quality of life and health in aging. In: D. Aslan, M. Ertem (Eds). Elderly Health: Problems and Solutions (pp. 72-80). Ankara: Association of Public Health Specialists Turkey, Publication No: 2012-1. (in Turkish).Google Scholar
  17. Tezcan, M. (1978). Social and educational aspects of recreational activities. Journal of Ankara University Education Faculty, 11(1), 165–179.  https://doi.org/10.1501/Egifak_0000000547.
  18. TRNC State Planning Organization (2013). Turkish republic of Northern Cyprus demographic and housing survey 2011. Bulletin, Absolute Scores Second Stage August 2013. Available at: http://www.devplan.org/nufus-2011/nufus%20ikinci_.pdf. Accessed 23 Aug 2017.
  19. WHO-World Health Organization (2002). Active ageing: A policy framework (2002). WHO reference number: WHO/NMH/NPH/02.8. Available at: http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/active_ageing/en/. Accessed 26 May 2017.
  20. WHO-World Health Organization (2005). Preventing chronic diseases: a vital investment, WHO Global Report 2005. ISBN 92 4 156300 1. Available at: http://www.who.int/chp/chronic_disease_report/contents/foreword.pdf?ua=1. Accessed 25 Aug 2017.
  21. WHO-World Health Organization (2011). Global health and aging. NIH Publication no. 11–7737 October 2011. Available at: http://www.who.int/ageing/publications/global_health.pdf?ua=1. Accessed 11 Sept 2017.
  22. WHO-World Health Organization (2015a). Ageing and health. Fact Sheet No. 404, September 2015. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs404/en/. Accessed 26 May 2017.
  23. WHO-World Health Organization (2015b). Global Health Observatory Data - Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD). Available at: http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/en/. Accessed 21 June 2017.
  24. WHO-World Health Organization (2015c). World Report on Ageing and Health, 2015. ISBN 978 92 4 069481 1 (PDF). Available at: http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/186463/1/9789240694811_eng.pdf?ua=1 . Accessed 25 May 2017.
  25. WHO-World Health Organization (2018). Aging and life-course. What is healthy ageing? Available at: http://www.who.int/ageing/healthy-aging/en/. Accessed 9 Jan 2018.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Medicine, Public Health DepartmentNear East UniversityNicosiaTurkish Republic of Northern Cyprus
  2. 2.NicosiaCyprus
  3. 3.University of Kyrenia HospitalKyreniaCyprus

Personalised recommendations