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Society

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Social Science and a Responsible Establishment

  • William WestonEmail author
Symposium: New Measures, New Ideas
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Abstract

Sociology already has a well-developed mission to help rising classes fight inequality. Sociology has an equal duty, and already has the tools, to help the dominant classes become responsible leaders of society as a whole. Following Bourdieu’s focus on the composition of capital, we can see that the knowledge-class fraction of the dominant class has the tools to teach the corporate-class fraction of the dominant class – and their children – to become a responsible establishment for the benefit of society as a whole.

Keywords

Establishment Composition of capital Meritocracy Cognitive elite Social responsibility Knowledge class Corporate class Bourdieu Baltzell Tocqueville Domhoff Mills Charles Murray 

Notes

Further Reading

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  5. Domhoff, G. W. 1967. Who Rules America. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
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  16. Zweigenhaft, R., & Domhoff, G. W. 1993. Blacks in the White Establishment: A Study of Race and Class in America. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Zweigenhaft, R., & Domhoff, G. W. 1998. Diversity in the Power Elite: Have Women and Minorities Reached the Top? New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre CollegeDanvilleUSA

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