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EBV-Associated Non-keratinizing Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma with Prominent Spindled Cell and Whorling Patterns: A Previously Unreported Histological Variant in a Patient Presenting with Dermatomyositis

  • Fredrik PeterssonEmail author
Sine qua non Clinicopathologic Correlation

Abstract

A case of non-keratinizing, EBV-positive (chromogenic EBER-in situ hybridization), carcinoma with a hitherto undescribed nodular whorling architecture is presented. The patient is a 55 year old male with 2 months history of dermatomyositis who was diagnosed with T1N0M0 non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The patient received radiotherapy with complete response. The tumor cells predominantly displayed spindle cell morphology, strongly expressed low-molecular weight cytokeratins (AE1-3), p63 and p40. There was no evidence of recurrence or disease progression on follow-up after 16 months which included post treatment biopsy, MRI and PET-CT scans.

Keywords

Nasopharynx Carcinoma Whorling Epstein–Barr virus 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The author has no conflict of interest. No funding was received.

Ethical Approval

It is my institution’s policy not to require formal ethical approval for reports on up to two patients.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyNational University Health SystemSingaporeSingapore

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