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An Ayurvedic Management of Nasal Polyposis

  • Achyuta AtaraEmail author
  • Manjusha Rajgopala
  • K. N. Pansara
  • Hiten Maniyar
  • Mukesh Naria
Original Article
  • 46 Downloads

Abstract

A nasal polyp is a prolapsed pedunculated part of the oedematous mucosa of the nose or paranasal sinuses. It is inflammatory in origin and not a neoplastic (Bhargava in A short book of E.N.T. diseases. 9th edn. Usha Publication, [1]). This present study was aimed to treat Nasal polyposis with the drug administration through nasal as well as oral route. Total 61 patients were registered in three groups. Simple random sampling (alternate) method was adopted for the selection of the patients and selected patients were divided into 3 groups. Patients of Nasya Group and Nasya + Oral group received Ayurvedic treatment where as Controlled Group patients were treated with allopathic medicine. Duration of treatment was kept 3 months for Nasya Group and Nasya + Oral group, while 21 days for Controlled Group. Follow up was kept for 2 months at interval of 15 days each. Though all three groups showed significant improvement in subjective symptoms; Nasya Group and Nasya + Oral group showed better result in grading of Polyp.

Keywords

Nasal polyp Ayurvedic treatment Nasya 

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by Ministry of AYUSH. Grant in aid general of non-planned regular grant of IPGT & RA was provided for the present study.

Compliance with Ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

Clinical study was started after getting approval of Institutional Ethics Committee. (IEC Appr. No.-PGT/7-A/Ethics/2012-2013/3552, dated 25/02/2013). All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Association of Otolaryngologists of India 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Achyuta Atara
    • 1
    Email author
  • Manjusha Rajgopala
    • 2
  • K. N. Pansara
    • 3
  • Hiten Maniyar
    • 4
  • Mukesh Naria
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Shalakyatantra, Shree Gulabkunverba Ayurved MahavidyalayaGujarat Ayurved UniversityJamnagarIndia
  2. 2.Department of ShalakyatantraAll India Institute of AyurvedaNew DelhiIndia
  3. 3.JamnagarIndia
  4. 4.M P Shah Medical CollegeJamnagarIndia
  5. 5.Pharmacology Laboratory, Institute for Postgraduate Teaching and Research in AyurvedaGujarat Ayurved UniversityJamnagarIndia

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