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A Rare Case of Locally Advanced Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumour of Neck Salvaged by a Radical Surgical Approach

  • S. S. Sundaram
  • Saravanan Robbins
  • D. PriyaEmail author
Original Article
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

Neuroendocrine tumours of head and neck are rare neoplasms and even more rare are those of cutaneous adenoid cystic carcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation. Virtually every known variant of neoplasia with neuroendocrine differentiation can arise in complex structures of head and neck (Mills in Endocr Pathol 7(4):329–343. doi: 10.1007/BF02739841) [1]. Such tumours are usually non functional, locally aggressive and may spread to lymph nodes or lungs. They are diagnosed by histopathology, immunohistochemistry and radionuclide imaging. When these tumours involve the carotid artery, they pose challenges in the surgical management.

Keywords

Neuroendocrine tumour Adenoid cystic carcinoma Differentiation Carotid resection 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflict of interest.

Informed Consent

Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and accompanying images. A copy of the written consent is available for review for by the Editor-in-chief of this journal is available on request.

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Copyright information

© Association of Otolaryngologists of India 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgical OncologyMadurai Medical CollegeMaduraiIndia
  2. 2.Department of Vascular SurgeryMadurai Medical CollegeMaduraiIndia
  3. 3.Department of General SurgeryMadurai Medical CollegeMaduraiIndia
  4. 4.ChennaiIndia

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