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Case report of thoracoscopic resection for broncholithiasis with severe obstructive pneumonia

  • Katsunari MatsuokaEmail author
  • Tetsu Yamada
  • Takahisa Matsuoka
  • Shinjiro Nagai
  • Mitsuhiro Ueda
  • Yoshihiro Miyamoto
Case report
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

Broncholithiasis is a rare disease characterized by bronchial erosion or distortion due to hilar or parenchymatous calcification. When a broncholith has no mobility and there is a risk of major bleeding if removal is attempted, surgical intervention is required. Most operations for broncholithiasis are performed via a thoracotomy, and bronchial lithotripsy under complete video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery has been reported only rarely. We have experienced a case of broncholithiasis with severe obstructive pneumonia that was treated successfully by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Thoracoscopic surgery is an effective treatment for broncholithiasis because it is minimally invasive and aids smooth recovery after surgery. When the adhesion between the pulmonary artery and the bronchus is highly advanced, it is advocated to cut them together using an endostapler.

Keywords

Broncholithiasis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery Obstructive pneumonia 

Notes

Funding

None

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Statement of human rights

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. For this type of study, formal consent is not required.

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Copyright information

© Indian Association of Cardiovascular-Thoracic Surgeons 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Thoracic SurgeryNational Hospital Organization Himeji Medical CenterHimeji CityJapan

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