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Journal of Earth System Science

, Volume 116, Issue 4, pp 275–304 | Cite as

Assimilation of Doppler weather radar observations in a mesoscale model for the prediction of rainfall associated with mesoscale convective systems

  • S. Abhilash
  • Someshwar Das
  • S. R. Kalsi
  • M. Das Gupta
  • K. Mohankumar
  • J. P. George
  • S. K. Banerjee
  • S. B. Thampi
  • D. Pradhan
Article

Abstract

Obtaining an accurate initial state is recognized as one of the biggest challenges in accurate model prediction of convective events. This work is the first attempt in utilizing the India Meteorological Department (IMD) Doppler radar data in a numerical model for the prediction of mesoscale convective complexes around Chennai and Kolkata. Three strong convective events both over Chennai and Kolkata have been considered for the present study. The simulation experiments have been carried out using fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) mesoscale model (MM5) version 3.5.6. The variational data assimilation approach is one of the most promising tools available for directly assimilating the mesoscale observations in order to improve the initial state. The horizontal wind derived from the DWR has been used alongwith other conventional and non-conventional data in the assimilation system. The preliminary results from the three dimensional variational (3DVAR) experiments are encouraging. The simulated rainfall has also been compared with that derived from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The encouraging result from this study can be the basis for further investigation of the direct assimilation of radar reflectivity data in 3DVAR system. The present study indicates that Doppler radar data assimilation improves the initial field and enhances the Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) skill.

Keywords

Tropical mesoscale convective systems Doppler weather radar 3DVAR radar reflectivity 

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Copyright information

© Indian Academy of Sciences 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Abhilash
    • 1
  • Someshwar Das
    • 2
  • S. R. Kalsi
    • 3
  • M. Das Gupta
    • 2
  • K. Mohankumar
    • 1
  • J. P. George
    • 2
  • S. K. Banerjee
    • 3
  • S. B. Thampi
    • 4
  • D. Pradhan
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Atmospheric SciencesCochin University of Science and TechnologyCochinIndia
  2. 2.National Center for Medium Range Weather ForecastingNoidaIndia
  3. 3.India Meteorological DepartmentMausam BhavanNew DelhiIndia
  4. 4.Cyclone Detection Radar, India Meteorological DepartmentRajaji SalaiChennaiIndia
  5. 5.India Meteorological DepartmentCyclone Detection Radar, Regional Meteorological CenterKolkataIndia

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