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Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer

, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 143–146 | Cite as

Isolated Metachronous Splenic Metastasis from Colon Cancer: Possible Explanations for This Rare Entity

  • Fabio Rizzo
  • Sergio Calamia
  • Giovanni Mingoia
  • Fabio Fulfaro
  • Nello Grassi
  • Calogero CipollaEmail author
Case Report
  • 52 Downloads

Introduction

The incidence of splenic metastases secondary to colorectal cancer is very low; these lesions have been more frequently reported as secondary to breast, lung, and ovarian cancer. Splenic metastases are particularly common in melanoma; their incidence has been reported as being as high as 34% at autopsy [ 1]. Most cases of secondary splenic metastases have been described in patients with tumors of the left colon while only few cases being reported as originating from right colon tumors (Table 1). The finding of a splenic mass in the absence of a history of malignancy suggests a primary lesion (lymphoma, hematoma, etc.), while a history of oncological disease raises the possibility of a secondary lesion [ 2].
Table 1

Literature review of isolated metachronous splenic metastasis from colorectal carcinoma

Case n

Year

Pathology

Primary tumor

Stage

Intervala

CEA level

1

1969

Adeno

Rectum

III

48

Not specified

2

1982

Adeno

Sigmoid

III

48

A

3

1986

Adeno

Cecum

III

30

A

4

1992

Adeno

Rectum...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from the individual described in this report.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Medical OncologyA.O.U. Policlinico “Paolo Giaccone”PalermoItaly
  2. 2.Division of General and Oncological SurgeryPalermoItaly

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