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Endocrine

pp 1–4 | Cite as

Sweat and vitamin D status in congenital, lifetime, untreated GH deficiency

  • Cynthia S. Barros-Oliveira
  • Roberto SalvatoriEmail author
  • Jéssica S. S. dos Santos
  • Paula F. C. Santos
  • Alécia A. Oliveira-Santos
  • Cindi G. Marinho
  • Elenilde G. Santos
  • Ângela C. G. B. Leal
  • Viviane C. Campos
  • Nayra P. Damascena
  • Carla R. P. Oliveira
  • Manuel H. Aguiar-Oliveira
Research Letter
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

A reciprocal relationship exists between the skin and the GH/IGF-I axis. Skin produces both IGF- I and vitamin D, and GH and IGF-I exert several actions in the skin. Reduced sweating and altered phosphor-calcium homeostasis are occasionally reported in subjects with GH deficiency (GHD), mostly in the setting of hypopituitarism, therefore associated to other hormonal deficiencies. It is unclear whether these findings are due to GHD. The aim of this study was to assess skin function in subjects with isolated GHD (IGHD) due to a mutation in the GHRH receptor gene.

Methods

In a cross-sectional study we enrolled 20 IGHD and 20 local controls. Sweating (volume, conductivity and chloride content) was assessed by a 30 min pilocarpine iontophoresis test, using the Macroduct® Sweat Collection System. IGF-I, Insulin, PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, C-reactive protein (CRP), CPK, glucose, calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins and fractions, urinary calcium, and insulin were measured. HOMA-IR was calculated.

Results

IGHD presented lower sweating, but normal vitamin D and phosphor-calcium homeostasis. Additionally, IGHD subjects presented lower HOMA-IR, higher CRP and reduced CPK.

Conclusion

Untreated IGHD cause reduction in sweating, but does not affect phosphor-calcium homeostasis.

KeyWords

GH deficiency skin sweat vitamin D 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Associação do Crescimento Físico e Humano de Itabaianinha for assistance.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia S. Barros-Oliveira
    • 1
  • Roberto Salvatori
    • 2
    Email author
  • Jéssica S. S. dos Santos
    • 1
  • Paula F. C. Santos
    • 1
  • Alécia A. Oliveira-Santos
    • 1
  • Cindi G. Marinho
    • 1
  • Elenilde G. Santos
    • 1
  • Ângela C. G. B. Leal
    • 1
  • Viviane C. Campos
    • 1
  • Nayra P. Damascena
    • 1
  • Carla R. P. Oliveira
    • 1
  • Manuel H. Aguiar-Oliveira
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of EndocrinologyFederal University of SergipeAracajuBrazil
  2. 2.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and MetabolismThe Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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