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Endocrine

pp 1–2 | Cite as

Adrenal myelolipoma in association with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

  • Hee Jin Kim
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor

The article by Decmann et al. titled “Adrenal myelolipoma: a comprehensive review” [1] was interesting and informative, in which the authors comprehensively analyzed adrenal myelolipomas by reviewing available articles on databases and their cases. Adrenal myelolipomas are the second most common primary adrenal incidentalomas following adrenocortical adenomas. According to their data, 10% of patients with myelolipoma had congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and 18.3% of all adrenal myelolipomas were associated with an endocrine disorder. Thus, they stated that the clinical picture should be considered a major factor in determining the necessity for hormonal work-up [1]. This proposal is meaningful because adrenal myelolipoma is considered a tumor that does not secrete hormones and is an exception to mandatory hormonal evaluations [2, 3]. In addition to their assertions, it is important to check whether patients with myelolipoma have CAH. This letter describes an...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The author declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

The patient provided written informed consent for publication of this case report.

References

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    Á. Decmann, P. Perge, M. Tóth, P. Igaz Adrenal myelolipoma: a comprehensive review. Endocrine 59, 7–15 (2018). 10.1007/S12020-017-1473-4CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    H. Falhammar, D.J. Torpy, Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency presenting as adrenal incidentaloma: a systemic review and meta-analysis. Endocr. Pract. 22, 736–753 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.4158/EP151085.RA CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    M. Fassnacht, W. Arlt, I. Bancos, H. Dralle, J. Newell-Price, A. Sahdev, A. Tabarin, M. Terzolo, S. Tsagarakis, O.M. Dekkers, Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal tumors. Eur. J. Endocrinol. 175, G1–G34 (2016).  https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-16-0467 CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineDankook University College of MedicineCheonanRepublic of Korea

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