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Endocrine

, Volume 59, Issue 3, pp 685–689 | Cite as

Intermittent administration of PTH induces the expression of osteocalcin and BMP-2 on choroid plexus cells associated with suppression of sclerostin, TGF-β1, and Na+K+ATPase

  • Allan Fernando GiovaniniEmail author
  • Isabella Göhringer
  • Rosangela Tavella
  • Manuelly Cristiny Linzmeyer
  • Thaynara Fernanda Priesnitz
  • Luana Mordask Bonetto
  • Rafaela Guimarães Resende
  • Rafaela Scariot
  • João Cesar Zielak
Research Letter

Introduction

The parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key hormone that acts on the regulation of calcium homeostasis and bone turnover. Despite evidence that this hormone has a dual action, for example, anabolic or catabolic effects, researchers have described that when the PTH is administrated in an intermittent form, it acts in favor of bone formation, which is why the Food and Drug Administration supports it for the treatment of osteoporosis [1]. According to this premise, some experiments with model animals have reinforced the hypothesis that this therapeutic approach may be a likely alternative to induce osteoneogenesis in areas that have been lost due to trauma, intra bonny cysts, or neoplasia [2].

The positive action of PTH signaling on bone is mediated by a G protein–coupled receptor referred to as PTH receptor-1 (PTH1R). In this way, the PTH/PTH1R interaction stimulates the Gαs-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, which, in turn, enhances bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2)...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Ethical approval

Approval from the institutional Animal Care Committee was obtained (protocol #296-2016). All applicable international and institutional Animal Care Committee guidelines for the care and use of animals were followed. This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allan Fernando Giovanini
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Isabella Göhringer
    • 1
  • Rosangela Tavella
    • 3
  • Manuelly Cristiny Linzmeyer
    • 1
  • Thaynara Fernanda Priesnitz
    • 1
  • Luana Mordask Bonetto
    • 1
  • Rafaela Guimarães Resende
    • 1
  • Rafaela Scariot
    • 1
  • João Cesar Zielak
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Master Program in Clinical DentistryPositivo UniversityCuritibaBrazil
  2. 2.Laboratory of Histopathology of Positivo UniversityCuritibaBrazil
  3. 3.Master Program in BiotechnologyPositivo UniversityCuritibaBrazil

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