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Current Psychiatry Reports

, 21:92 | Cite as

A Brief but Comprehensive Review of Research on the Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders

  • Johannes ZimmermannEmail author
  • André Kerber
  • Katharina Rek
  • Christopher J. Hopwood
  • Robert F. Krueger
Personality Disorders (K Bertsch, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Personality Disorders

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Both the Alternative DSM-5 Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD) and the chapter on personality disorders (PD) in the recent version of ICD-11 embody a shift from a categorical to a dimensional paradigm for the classification of PD. We describe these new models, summarize available measures, and provide a comprehensive review of research on the AMPD.

Recent Findings

A total of 237 publications on severity (criterion A) and maladaptive traits (criterion B) of the AMPD indicate (a) acceptable interrater reliability, (b) largely consistent latent structures, (c) substantial convergence with a range of theoretically and clinically relevant external measures, and (d) some evidence for incremental validity when controlling for categorical PD diagnoses. However, measures of criterion A and B are highly correlated, which poses conceptual challenges.

Summary

The AMPD has stimulated extensive research with promising findings. We highlight open questions and provide recommendations for future research.

Keywords

Personality disorders DSM-5 ICD-11 Dimensional models Reliability Validity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Hannah Jungmann, Christine Starke, and Lara Oeltjen for their support in reviewing the published literature.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Johannes Zimmermann, André Kerber, Katharina Rek, and Christopher J. Hopwood each declare no potential conflicts of interest.

Robert F. Krueger is a co-author of the PID-5 and provides consulting services to aid users of the PID-5 in the interpretation of test scores. PID-5 is the intellectual property of the American Psychiatric Association, and Robert F. Krueger does not receive royalties or any other compensation from publication or administration of the inventory.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Johannes Zimmermann
    • 1
    Email author
  • André Kerber
    • 2
  • Katharina Rek
    • 3
  • Christopher J. Hopwood
    • 4
  • Robert F. Krueger
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KasselKasselGermany
  2. 2.Freie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany
  3. 3.Max-Planck-Institut für PsychiatrieMunichGermany
  4. 4.University of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  5. 5.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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