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Utility of 8-Aminoquinolines in Malaria Prophylaxis in Travelers

  • Eyal MeltzerEmail author
  • Eli SchwartzEmail author
Tropical, Travel and Emerging Infections (L Chen and A Boggild, Section Editors)
  • 7 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Tropical, Travel and Emerging Infections

Abstract

Purpose of Review

To review the current status of 8-aminoquinolines in the prophylaxis of malaria among travelers, in light of the recent approval of tafenoquine.

Recent Findings

Primaquine continues to provide excellent primary prophylaxis against all Plasmodium species. Tafenoquine provides similarly good prophylaxis, with the benefit of weekly dosing. Both agents require glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity testing before use and are contraindicated in pregnancy. Pharmacodynamic variability relating to CYP2D6 may underlie some cases of primaquine failure; the effects of CYP2D6 on tafenoquine efficacy require further study.

Summary

Tafenoquine and primaquine are the only current drugs that provide complete malaria prophylaxis, and should be considered the agents of choice in areas where both P. vivax and falciparum are frequent. Monthly tafenoquine is promising and should be further studied in travelers.

Keywords

8-aminoquinolines Primaquine Tafenoquine Plasmodium vivax Plasmodium falciparum 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

All authors declare no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Geographic Medicine and Department of Medicine CSheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  2. 2.Sackler School of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael

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