Device Utilization Ratios in Infection Prevention: Process or Outcome Measure?

  • Jessica I. Abrantes-Figueiredo
  • Jack W. Ross
  • David B. Banach
Healthcare Associated Infections (G Bearman and D Morgan, Section Editors)
  • 44 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Healthcare Associated Infections

Abstract

Purpose of Review

The purpose of this review is to describe the role of device utilization as a component of surveillance for healthcare-associated infections and describe its potential role as a measurement of healthcare quality.

Recent Findings

Device utilization, while primarily a process-based measure in the prevention of device-associated infections can also serve as an important outcome in the evaluation of an infection prevention program.

Summary

Device utilization can be an important and resource-efficient measurement when coupled with measurements of risk-adjusted infection rates. The measurement of the device utilization ratio can provide insight into the risk of device-associated harms, including non-infectious harms, which would not be captured with currently used infection-based surveillance metrics. Further study and validation of standardized, risk-adjusted device utilization measurements is an important area for future exploration.

Keywords

Device utilization Catheter-associated urinary tract infection Quality measurements 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Jessica I. Abrantes-Figueiredo, Jack W. Ross, and David B. Banach declare they have no conflicts of interests.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica I. Abrantes-Figueiredo
    • 1
  • Jack W. Ross
    • 1
    • 2
  • David B. Banach
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Connecticut School of MedicineFarmingtonUSA
  2. 2.Hartford HealthcareHartfordUSA

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