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Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 189–200 | Cite as

A Brief History of Personality Assessment in Police Psychology: 1916–2008

  • Peter A. Weiss
  • Robin Inwald
Article

Abstract

Since the 1960s, the application of psychological services and research to law enforcement settings (known as “police psychology”) evolved from being practically nonexistent to almost universal in a relatively short period of time (Scrivner 2006). Currently, psychologists provide a variety of services to law enforcement agencies, including performing evaluations for pre-employment selection, “fitness-for-duty” evaluations (FFDE), and counseling/treatment for psychologically troubled officers and first responders. The extensive use of personality assessment instruments in police psychology is not surprising given the fact psychologists have traditionally concerned themselves with issues of psychological measurement and test construction. In the contemporary practice of police psychology, assessment using personality measures is essential, being utilized in all of the abovementioned evaluations, in addition to other occasional applications (Weiss et al. 2008). This article provides a brief history of personality assessment in police and public safety psychology as it developed from 1916 to 2008.

Keywords

Police psychology assessment Personality tests for police History of personality tests for police and public safety Guidelines for police and public safety officer assessment Testing guidelines in police evaluations History of fitness for duty evaluation guidelines History of police candidate evaluation guidelines Police testing Candidate evaluations for public safety officers History of personality assessment in law enforcement History of police pre-employment personality testing IPI Robin Inwald Hilson Research Inwald tests, Hilson tests, HPP/SQ, MMPI, MMPI-2, P. Weiss, Peter Weiss Inwald Personality Inventory Hilson Test Battery 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Added Acknowledgement to the original source as requested by Charles C Thomas in October 30, 2017 permission letter: From Peter A. Weiss, Personality Assessment in Police Psychology: A Twenty-First Century Perspective, First Edition, 2010, Chapter 1 on pp. 5–29. Courtesy of Charles C Thomas Publisher, Ltd., Springfield, Illinois.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

Reprinting with minor changes (dates qualified to specify this historical review from 1916 to 2008) From Charles C Thomas, initial Publisher, and Eric Hickey, Editor (see attached permission form from Charles C Thomas Publisher, Ltd./invoice—no charges assessed for reprinting the chapter.

Informed Consent

No human/animal subjects used in this historical review.

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Copyright information

© Society for Police and Criminal Psychology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VancouverUSA
  2. 2.University of HartfordWest HartfordUSA
  3. 3.Inwald Research, IncCleverdaleUSA

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