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Current Cardiology Reports

, 21:88 | Cite as

Effectiveness of Changes in Diet Composition on Reducing the Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease

  • Ilaria Calabrese
  • Gabriele RiccardiEmail author
Lipid Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Prevention (G De Backer, Section Editor)
  • 123 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Lipid Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Prevention

Abstract

Purpose of Review

To highlight dietary changes shown to be associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events in epidemiological studies and that have been proven to be effective in preventing cardiovascular diseases in clinical trials

Recent Findings

Since dietary changes always involve multiple variables, recent observational and intervention studies on dietary prevention of cardiovascular disease focus not only to the limitation of a single nutrient/food intake but also to the other dietary changes implemented to replace it.

Summary

The available evidence supports three major dietary strategies for cardiovascular disease prevention: (1) the replacement of saturated fat with unsaturated fat and/or fiber-rich carbohydrate foods; (2) the reduction of salt intake; (3) the implementation of dietary patterns resembling the traditional Mediterranean diet. This support derives not only from RCTs but also from the combination of large observational cohort studies and relatively short-term randomized trials on cardiovascular risk factors.

Keywords

Dietary fats Dietary carbohydrates Sodium intake Mediterranean diet Cardiovascular disease Mortality 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The expert linguistic revision of R. Scala is gratefully acknowledged.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Ilaria Calabrese and Gabriele Riccardi declare that they have no conflicts of interests in relation to the content of this article.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Supplementary material

11886_2019_1176_MOESM1_ESM.docx (54 kb)
ESM 1 (DOCX 54 kb)
11886_2019_1176_MOESM2_ESM.docx (42 kb)
ESM 2 (DOCX 42 kb)

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical Medicine and SurgeryFederico II UniversityNaplesItaly

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