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Irish Journal of Medical Science (1971 -)

, Volume 188, Issue 1, pp 303–310 | Cite as

Admission and readmission rate incidences from deprived areas—impact of a classical or multi-dimensional model

  • Declan ByrneEmail author
  • Richard Conway
  • Seán Cournane
  • Deirdre O’Riordan
  • Bernard Silke
Original Article

Abstract

Introduction

Classical deprivation instruments use a factor analytical approach relying on a smaller number of dimensions, factors or components. Multi-dimensional deprivation models attempt classification in fine detail—even down to street level.

Methods

Single-centre retrospective cohort study using routinely collected aggregated and anonymised data on emergency medical admissions (96,526 episodes in 50,731 patients; 2002–2016). We calculated admission/readmission rate incidences for the 74 small areas within the hospital catchment area. We compared a classical Small Area Health Research Unit (SAHRU) to the multi-dimensional POBAL Haase and Pratschke Deprivation Index for Small Areas (POBAL) deprivation instrument and their deprivation ranks for two Irish censuses (2006/ 2011).

Results

There was poor agreement between the instruments of the Deprivation Ranks by Quintile—with agreement in 46 and 42% of small areas for the respective 2006 and 2011 censuses. The classical model (SAHRU) suggested more areas with severe deprivation (Q5 66 and 55%) compared with POBAL (Q5 32 and 24%) from the respective censuses. SAHRU classical instrument had a higher prediction level incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.48 (95% CI 1.47, 1.49)) compared with POBAL IRR 1.28 (95% CI 1.27, 1.28) and systematically lower estimates of hospital admission and readmission rate incidences. Earlier Census data modelled more powerfully, suggesting a long latency between social circumstances and the ultimate expression of the emergency medical admission.

Conclusion

Deprivation influences hospital incidence rates for emergency medical admissions and readmissions; instruments focusing at the very small area (individual or street level) have a utility but appear inferior in terms of representing the population risk of environmental/socio-economic factors which seem best approximated at a larger scale.

Keywords

Deprivation model Emergency medical admission Incidence rates 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Royal Academy of Medicine in Ireland 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineSt. James’s HospitalDublin 8Ireland
  2. 2.Department of Medical PhysicsSt. Vincent’s University HospitalDublin 4Ireland

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