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New technique of comprehensive utilization of spent Al2O3-based catalyst

  • Feng Qi-ming Email author
  • Chen Yun 
  • Shao Yan-hai 
  • Zhang Guo-fan 
  • Ou Le-ming 
  • Lu Yi-ping 
Article

Abstract

A new technology was developed to recover multiple valuable elements from the spent Al2O3-based catalyst by X-ray phase analysis and exploratory experiments. The experimental results show that in the condition of roasting temperature of 750 °C and roasting time of 30 min, molar ratio of Na2O to Al2O3 of 1.2, the leaching rates of alumina, vanadium and molybdenum in the spent catalyst are 97.2%, 95.8% and 98.9%, respectively. Vanadium and molybdenum in sodium aluminate solution can be recovered by precipitators A and B, and the precipitation rates of vanadium and molybdenum are 94.8% and 92.6%. Al(OH)3 was prepared from sodium aluminate solution in the carbonation decomposition process, and the purity of Al2O3 is 99.9% after calcination, the recovery of alumina reaches 90.6% in the whole process; the Ni-Co concentrate was leached by sulfuric acid, a nickel recovery of 98.2% and cobalt recovery over 98.5% can be obtained under the experimental condition of 30% H2SO4, 80°C, reaction time 4 h, mass ratio of liquid to solid 8, stirring rate 800 r/min.

Key words

spent Al2O3-based catalyst vanadium molybdenum comprehensive utilization roasting with sodium leaching rate 

CLC number

TF802.2 

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Copyright information

© Central South University 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Feng Qi-ming 
    • 1
    Email author
  • Chen Yun 
    • 1
  • Shao Yan-hai 
    • 1
  • Zhang Guo-fan 
    • 1
  • Ou Le-ming 
    • 1
  • Lu Yi-ping 
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Resources Processing and BioengineeringCentral South UniversityChangshaChina

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