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Identification and significance of differential proteins in A549 cells transfected with HLCDG1

  • Zou Fei-yan 
  • Xie Hai-long 
  • Zeng Ping-yao 
  • Chen Zhu-chu 
  • Li Feng 
  • Xiao Zhi-qiang 
  • Feng Xue-ping 
  • Zhang Peng-fei 
  • Yang Hai-yan 
  • Hu Wei 
  • Yu Yan-hui 
  • Ouyang Yong-mei 
Article
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Abstract

HLCDG1, which locates in chromosome 5q33, is a novel gene cloned recently. The HLCDG1 expression was significantly down regulated in the primary lung carcinoma. It was previously studied that HLCDG1 acted like a tumor suppressor gene. In this paper, proteomics studies were performed to analyze the proteomic expression patterns in the HLCDG1-transfected human lung carcinoma cell line (A549-HLCDG1) and in the control vector-transfected human lung carcinoma cell line (A549-vector). Employing two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE), the global pattern of protein expressions in A549-HLCDG1 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line expressing stably HLCDG1 gene were compared with those of control A549-vector cell line to generate a differential protein expression catalog. Forty-two differentially expressed proteins were screened. Thirteen differential proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), which were 6 up-regulated (MSH5, MOD, MDH precursor, ETFβ, Prxd VI and JM23) and 7 downregulated (PLC-δ1, hnRNPA2, hnRNPB1, TIM, TCTP, nm23H-1 and PrxdV) proteins in A549-HLCDG1 cells compared to control A549-vector cells. The above identified proteins were involved in energy metabolism, transcription regulation, antioxidation, cell cycle, metastasis, DNA methylation and mismatch repair. Therefore, these differential expression proteins by HLCDG1 transfection may play some important roles for investigation of the biochemical basis of growth suppression of HLCDG1 gene in lung carcinoma cells A549. Further understanding of this data base may provide valuable resources for the developing novel diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of lung cancer.

Key words

HLCDG1 gene lung carcinoma cell two-dimensional gel electrophoresis mass spectrometry proteomics 

CLC number

R734.2 

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Copyright information

© Central South University 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zou Fei-yan 
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xie Hai-long 
    • 3
  • Zeng Ping-yao 
    • 1
  • Chen Zhu-chu 
    • 1
    • 4
  • Li Feng 
    • 1
  • Xiao Zhi-qiang 
    • 4
  • Feng Xue-ping 
    • 4
  • Zhang Peng-fei 
    • 4
  • Yang Hai-yan 
    • 1
    • 4
  • Hu Wei 
    • 1
    • 4
  • Yu Yan-hui 
    • 1
  • Ouyang Yong-mei 
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cell Biology, Cancer Research Institute, Xiangya School of MedicineCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Institute for Reproductive Immunology ResearchJinan UniversityGuangzhouChina
  3. 3.Department of Pathology of Medical CollegeNanhua UniversityHengyangChina
  4. 4.Medical Research Center of Xiangya Hospital, Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of HealthCentral South UniversityChangshaChina

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