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Applied Geophysics

, Volume 15, Issue 3–4, pp 500–512 | Cite as

Fast 3D forward modeling of the magnetic field and gradient tensor on an undulated surface

  • Kun Li
  • Long-Wei ChenEmail author
  • Qing-Rui Chen
  • Shi-Kun Dai
  • Qian-Jiang Zhang
  • Dong-Dong Zhao
  • Jia-Xuan Ling
Article

Abstract

Magnetic field gradient tensor technique provides abundant data for delicate inversion of subsurface magnetic susceptibility distribution. Large scale magnetic data inversion imaging requires high speed and accuracy for forward modeling. For arbitrarily distributed susceptibility data on an undulated surface, we propose a fast 3D forward modeling method in the wavenumber domain based on (1) the wavenumber-domain expression of the prism combination model and the Gauss–FFT algorithm and (2) cubic spline interpolation. We apply the proposed 3D forward modeling method to synthetic data and use weighting coefficients in the wavenumber domain to improve the modeling for multiple observation surfaces, and also demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

Keywords

Undulated surface magnetic field gradient tensor 3D forward modeling Gauss–FFT algorithm wavenumber domain 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Dr. Yungui Xu and Dr. Shunguo Wang for help with the English. The editors and reviewers are also thanked for comments and suggestions that improved the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Editorial Office of Applied Geophysics and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kun Li
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Long-Wei Chen
    • 4
    Email author
  • Qing-Rui Chen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Shi-Kun Dai
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Qian-Jiang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Dong-Dong Zhao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jia-Xuan Ling
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Hunan Key Laboratory of Nonferrous Resources and Geological Hazards ExplorationChangshaChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Metallogenic Prediction of Nonferrous Metals and Geological Environment Monitoring of Ministry of EducationCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  3. 3.School of Geosciences and Info-Physics of Central South UniversityChangshaChina
  4. 4.School of College of Earth Sciences of Guilin University of TechnologyGuilinChina

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