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General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

, Volume 61, Issue 8, pp 469–472 | Cite as

Periodic appearance and disappearance of a chest wall (serratus anterior development) cavernous hemangioma that was finally resected in a child

  • Tomoki NakagawaEmail author
  • Hajime Watanabe
  • Kenei Nakazato
  • Daisuke Masuda
  • Go Ogura
  • Ryota Masuda
  • Naoya Nakamura
  • Masayuki Iwazaki
Case Report
  • 138 Downloads

Abstract

Primary chest wall tumors occur infrequently; in particular, cavernous hemangioma of the chest wall is an extremely rare disease. We report a case of child with cavernous hemangioma of the chest wall, which was successfully resected. Obvious enlargement of the tumor and the appearance of pain were observed during a 2-year follow-up. In the present case, transcutaneous ultrasonography showed the appearance and disappearance of the mass. This was considered to be caused by the transfer of contents between the shallow and deep parts of the tumor. This may have resulted from serratus anterior muscle movement between the two-layered tumor. Transcutaneous ultrasonography, as well as magnetic resonance imaging, was therefore extremely effective for preoperative diagnosis. Transcutaneous ultrasonography is easily performed, even in children, such as in the present case. Because of its simplicity and usefulness, transcutaneous ultrasonography may be considered as the first-line imaging modality for diagnosis.

Keywords

Chest wall tumor Cavernous hemangioma Serratus anterior muscle 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Association for Thoracic Surgery 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomoki Nakagawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hajime Watanabe
    • 1
  • Kenei Nakazato
    • 1
  • Daisuke Masuda
    • 1
  • Go Ogura
    • 2
  • Ryota Masuda
    • 1
  • Naoya Nakamura
    • 2
  • Masayuki Iwazaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Department of SurgeryTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  2. 2.Division of PathologyTokai University School of MedicineKanagawaJapan

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