Advertisement

Production Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 79–87 | Cite as

Surface integrity of turned laser-welded hybrid shafts

  • B. Denkena
  • B. Breidenstein
  • T. Grove
  • V. PrasanthanEmail author
  • L. Overmeyer
  • S. Nothdurft
  • S. Kaierle
  • J. Wallaschek
  • J. Twiefel
  • H. Ohrdes
  • H. J. Maier
  • T. Hassel
  • M. Mildebrath
Production Process
  • 67 Downloads

Abstract

For applications like components of vehicle drives, e.g. drive shaft or motor shaft, the increasing amount of CO2 emission becomes a major challenge. Weight reduction of vehicle parts is one possibility to reduce CO2 emission. Therefore functionally adapted components must be designed in order to become smaller and lighter. Consequently monolithic material is not sufficient anymore, so there is a demand for tailored hybrid parts consisting of more than one material. Those tailored hybrid parts have to pass through a processing chain. There is the option of joining different materials in the hybrid part to meet the requirements. The discussed combination is a SAE1020-SAE5120 compound. Laser beam welding is an appropriate joining process due to its reduced heat influence, the resulting narrow welds and a low post-processing effort. Thus semi-finished products for the manufacturing of tailored hybrid shafts with graded properties can be produced efficiently. Further in the process chain there is the need for machining to reach an adequate level of accuracy of shape and dimension. Moreover the residual stress modification by the machining process has a deep impact on the lifespan of hybrid components. Therefore in this paper the machinability of the SAE1020-SAE5120 compound compared with a SAE1020-SAE1020 compound will be examined. The effect of cutting edge micro geometry on the surface and subsurface properties is analysed. Relationships between process forces, residual stresses and surface roughness are investigated. Metallographic cross sections and hardness measurements will show the connection between welded materials. The transition zone—the weld between the monomaterials—is the centre of attention for the investigations.

Keywords

Subsurface properties Residual stresses Surface integrity Hybrid shaft Laser welding Steel welding 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The results presented in this paper were obtained from the Collaborative Research Centre 1153 “Process chain to produce hybrid high performance components with Tailored Forming” in subprojects A3 and B4. The authors thank the German Research Foundation (DFG) for the financial support of this project.

References

  1. 1.
    Seffer O, Lahdo R, Springer A, Kaierle S (2014) Laser-GMA hybrid welding of API 5L X70 with 23 mm plate thickness using 16 kW disk laser and two GMA welding power sources. J Laser Appl 26 4:042005-1–042005-9Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lahdo R, Seffer O, Springer A, Kaierle S, Overmeyer L (2014) GMA-laser hybrid welding of high-strength fine-grain structural steel with an inductive preheating. Phys Proc 56:637–645CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Suder W, Ganguly S, Williams S, Paradowska A, Colegrove P (2011) Comparison of joining efficiency and residual stresses in laser and laser hybrid welding. Sci Technol Weld Joi 16 3:244–248CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Breidenstein Β (2011) Oberflächen und Randzonen hoch belasteter Bauteile. Habilitation, Leibniz Universität HannoverGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Krektuleva RA, Cherepanov OI, Cherepanov RO (2016) Numerical investigation of residual thermal stresses in welded joints of heterogeneous steels with account of technological features of multi-pass welding. Appl Math Model 42:244–256MathSciNetCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Capello E (2005) Residual stresses in turning Part I: influence of process parameters. J Mater Process Techno 160:221–228CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mohammadpour M, Razfar MR, Jalili Saffar R (2010) Numerical investigating the effect of machining parameters on residual stresses in orthogonal cutting. Simul Model Pract Theory 18:378–389CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Pawade RS, Joshi SS, Brahmankar PK (2008) Effect of machining parameters and cutting edge geometry on surface integrity of high-speed turned Inconel 718. Int J Mach Tool Manu 48:15–28CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Sadat AB, Bailey JA (1987) Residual stresses in turned AISI 4340 steel. Exp Mech 27 1:80–85CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Thiele JD (1998) An investigation of surface generation mechanism for finish hard turning of AISI 52100 steel. M. S. thesis, The George W. Woodruff School of mechanical engineering, Georgia Institute of Technlogy, Atlanta, GAGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Woite M GmbH (2012) Werkstoff-Nr. 1.0460. http://woite-edelstahl.info/10460de.html. Accessed 25 May 2018
  12. 12.
    Deutsche Edelstahlwerke Services GmbH (2011) Cr-Mn-legierter Einsatzstahl 1.7147/1.7149 20MnCr5/20MnCrS5. https://www.dew-stahl.com/fileadmin/files/dewstahl.com/documents/Publikationen/Werkstoffdatenblaetter/Baustahl/1.7147_1.7149_de.pdf. Accessed 25 May 2018
  13. 13.
    Denkena B, Reichstein M, Brodehl J, de León Garcia L (2005) Surface Preparation, coating and wear performance of geometrically defined cutting edges. Proc 5th Int Conf “The Coatings” Manuf Eng Key Eng Mater 438:1–7Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Bragg WH, Bragg WL (1913) The reflection of X-rays by crystals. Proc R Soc A Math Phys Eng Sci 88(605):428–438CrossRefzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Breidenstein B, Denkena B, Prasanthan V (2016) Energy dispersive residual stress determination, 2. Internationale Konferenz: Euro hybrid –materials and structures, Kaiserslautern, 211–215Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Breidenstein B, Denkena B, Mörke T, Prasanthan V (2017) Non-destructive determination of residual stress depth profiles of hybrid components by energy dispersive residual stress measurement. Key Eng Mater 742:613–620CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Klaus M (2009) Röntgendiffraktometrische Ermittlung tiefenabhängiger Eigenspannungsverteilungen in Dünnschichtsystemen mit komplexen Aufbau. Dissertation, Technische Universität BerlinGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Attanasio A, Gelfi M, Pola A, Ceretti E, Giardini C (2013) Influence of material microstructures in micromilling of Ti6Al4V alloy. Materials 9 6:4268–4283CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Denkena
    • 1
  • B. Breidenstein
    • 1
  • T. Grove
    • 1
  • V. Prasanthan
    • 1
    Email author
  • L. Overmeyer
    • 2
  • S. Nothdurft
    • 2
  • S. Kaierle
    • 2
  • J. Wallaschek
    • 3
  • J. Twiefel
    • 3
  • H. Ohrdes
    • 3
  • H. J. Maier
    • 4
  • T. Hassel
    • 4
  • M. Mildebrath
    • 4
  1. 1.Institute of Production Engineering and Machine ToolsLeibniz University HannoverGarbsenGermany
  2. 2.Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.HannoverGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Dynamics and Vibration ResearchLeibniz University HannoverHannoverGermany
  4. 4.Institute of Materials ScienceLeibniz University HannoverGarbsenGermany

Personalised recommendations