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Intranasal sufentanil given in the emergency department triage zone for severe acute traumatic pain: a randomized double-blind controlled trail—reply

  • Fabien LemoelEmail author
  • Jacques Levraut
CE - LETTER TO THE EDITOR
  • 8 Downloads

Dear Editor,

We appreciate the comments by Corcostegui et al. [1] on our article [2] showing the impact of a single dose of intranasal (IN) sufentanil on the management of severe traumatic pain in the emergency department (ED), and read with great interest their use of this non-invasive analgesia in the extreme setting of tactical medicine. In every situation where intravenous (IV) access is time consuming, challenging or impossible, an efficient and safe alternative route of administration is indeed detrimental. Time is crucial during emergency medical support in police operations or armed conflicts, but safe and potent management of traumatic pain is likewise essential, despite a very unbalanced caregiver–patient ratio. Overcrowding can also be a difficult situation, where ED providers may be too busy to treat early and efficiently each severely painful patient [3], leaving room for delayed and possibly insufficient pain control (oligoanalgesia).

By this way, we totally agree with...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Statement of human and animal rights

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

All participants provided informed consent prior to their participation.

References

  1. 1.
    Corcostegui S-P, Commeau D, Galant J et al (2019) Intranasal sufentanil given in the emergency department triage zone for severe acute traumatic pain—a randomized double-blind controlled trail: comment. Intern Emerg Med.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-019-02069-5 Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lemoel F, Contenti J, Cibiera C et al (2019) Intranasal sufentanil given in the emergency department triage zone for severe acute traumatic pain: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. Intern Emerg Med.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11739-018-02014-y Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Pines JM, Hollander JE (2008) Emergency department crowding is associated with poor care for patients with severe pain. Ann Emerg Med 51(1):1–5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Grissa MH, Boubaker H, Zorgati A et al (2015) Efficacy and safety of nebulized morphine given at 2 different doses compared to IV titrated morphine in trauma pain. Am J Emerg Med 33(11):1557–1561CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Frey TM, Florin TA, Caruso M et al (2018) Effect of intranasal ketamine vs fentanyl on pain reduction for extremity injuries in children: the PRIME randomized clinical trial. JAMA Pediatr 173(2):140CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Società Italiana di Medicina Interna (SIMI) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Emergency Department, Hôpital Pasteur 2Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nice, 30 voie RomaineNiceFrance
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversité Côte d’AzurNiceFrance

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