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Frontiers of Structural and Civil Engineering

, Volume 13, Issue 6, pp 1432–1445 | Cite as

Development of dimensionless P-I diagram for curved SCS sandwich shell subjected to uniformly distributed blast pressure

  • Yonghui WangEmail author
  • Ximei Zhai
Research Article
  • 12 Downloads

Abstract

The curved steel-concrete-steel (SCS) sandwich shell was recently proposed to resist blast loading and it showed better blast resistant performance as compared to flat SCS sandwich shell via developing compressive force along the shell. In this paper, a dimensionless Pressure-Impulse (P-I) diagram was constructed as a convenient tool to predict the damage level of curved SCS sandwich shell subjected to uniformly distributed blast loading. The curved SCS sandwich shell was equivalent to a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system and the equation of motion was established by employing the Lagrange’s equation. To construct the dimensionless P-I diagram, the energy balance method was utilized to yield the pressure and impulse asymptotes and the responses in the dynamic response regime were obtained via employing the SDOF method. Then, the finite element method was employed to validate the developed dimensionless P-I diagram. Finally, the procedures of using the constructed dimensionless P-I diagram to quickly conduct the blast resistant design of curved SCS sandwich shell were presented.

Keywords

blast loading curved steel-concrete-steel sandwich shell Pressure-Impulse diagram single-degree-of-freedom method finite element analysis 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

The research presented in this paper was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51608151), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Nos. 2017T100245, 2016M600252), Heilongjiang Postdoctoral Fund (No. LBH-Z16063) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. HIT. NSRIF.2019069).

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Lab of Structures Dynamic Behavior and Control of the Ministry of EducationHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinChina
  2. 2.Key Lab of Smart Prevention and Mitigation of Civil Engineering Disasters of the Ministry of Industry and Information TechnologyHarbin Institute of TechnologyHarbinChina

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