Pinpointing and scheduling access conflicts to improve internal resource utilization in solid-state drives

  • Xuchao Xie
  • Liquan Xiao
  • Dengping Wei
  • Qiong Li
  • Zhenlong Song
  • Xiongzi Ge
Research Article
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

Modern solid-state drives (SSDs) are integrating more internal resources to achieve higher capacity. Parallelizing accesses across internal resources can potentially enhance the performance of SSDs. However, exploiting parallelism inside SSDs is challenging owing to real-time access conflicts. In this paper, we propose a highly parallelizable I/O scheduler (PIOS) to improve internal resource utilization in SSDs from the perspective of I/O scheduling. Specifically, we first pinpoint the conflicting flash requests with precision during the address translation in the Flash Translation Layer (FTL). Then, we introduce conflict eliminated requests (CERs) to reorganize the I/O requests in the device-level queue by dispatching conflicting flash requests to different CERs. Owing to the significant performance discrepancy between flash read and write operations, PIOS employs differentiated scheduling schemes for read and write CER queues to always allocate internal resources to the conflicting CERs that are more valuable. The small dominant size prioritized scheduling policy for the write queue significantly decreases the average write latency. The high parallelism density prioritized scheduling policy for the read queue better utilizes resources by exploiting internal parallelism aggressively. Our evaluation results show that the parallelizable I/O scheduler (PIOS) can accomplish better SSD performance than existing I/O schedulers implemented in both SSD devices and operating systems.

Keywords

solid-state drive access conflict I/O scheduler internal resource utilization PIOS 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the Advanced Research Project of China (31511010202) and the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2016YFB0200203).

Supplementary material

11704_2018_7113_MOESM1_ESM.ppt (362 kb)
Pinpointing and scheduling access conflicts to improve internal resource utilization in solid-state drives

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuchao Xie
    • 1
  • Liquan Xiao
    • 1
  • Dengping Wei
    • 1
  • Qiong Li
    • 1
  • Zhenlong Song
    • 1
  • Xiongzi Ge
    • 2
  1. 1.College of ComputerNational University of Defense TechnologyChangshaChina
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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