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Frontiers of Computer Science

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 292–301 | Cite as

Scene word recognition from pieces to whole

  • Anna ZhuEmail author
  • Seiichi Uchida
Research Article
  • 24 Downloads

Abstract

Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) have had great success with regard to the object classification problem. For character classification, we found that training and testing using accurately segmented character regions with CNNs resulted in higher accuracy than when roughly segmented regions were used. Therefore, we expect to extract complete character regions from scene images. Text in natural scene images has an obvious contrast with its attachments. Many methods attempt to extract characters through different segmentation techniques. However, for blurred, occluded, and complex background cases, those methods may result in adjoined or over segmented characters. In this paper, we propose a scene word recognition model that integrates words from small pieces to entire after-cluster-based segmentation. The segmented connected components are classified as four types: background, individual character proposals, adjoined characters, and stroke proposals. Individual character proposals are directly inputted to a CNN that is trained using accurately segmented character images. The sliding window strategy is applied to adjoined character regions. Stroke proposals are considered as fragments of entire characters whose locations are estimated by a stroke spatial distribution system. Then, the estimated characters from adjoined characters and stroke proposals are classified by a CNN that is trained on roughly segmented character images. Finally, a lexicon-driven integration method is performed to obtain the final word recognition results. Compared to other word recognition methods, our method achieves a comparable performance on Street View Text and the ICDAR 2003 and ICDAR 2013 benchmark databases. Moreover, our method can deal with recognizing text images of occlusion and improperly segmented text images.

Keywords

text recognition convolutional neural networks cluster-based segmentation character integration 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61703316), and in part by the Human Interface Lab of Kyushu University, Japan.

Supplementary material

11704_2017_6420_MOESM1_ESM.ppt (276 kb)
Supplementary material, approximately 276 KB.

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Copyright information

© Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SCSTWuhan University of TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.ISEE-AITKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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