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Letter to the Editor Concerning: Borude, S (2019). Which Is a Good Diet—Veg or Non-veg? Faith-Based Vegetarianism for Protection from Obesity—a Myth or Actuality?

  • Maximilian Andreas StorzEmail author
Letter to the Editor
  • 54 Downloads

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The author declares that he has no conflict of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.TübingenGermany

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