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Is Transdermal Multivitamin Patch Effective in Gastric Bypass Patients?

  • Shireesh SaurabhEmail author
  • Yubo Gao
  • Sara Maduka
  • Lori Smith
  • Rachel Lasley
  • Namrata Singh
Original Contributions

Abstract

Background

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) patients are recommended to take multiple oral vitamin supplements daily. Transdermal multivitamin patches are being advertised as an alternative for use in bariatric patients with no data to support their efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate response to daily transdermal use of multivitamin patch after LRYGB and to compare them with a control group of similar patients who used oral supplements.

Methods

A retrospective review was carried out on patients who had LRYGB at a community hospital from February 2015 to February 2019. Patients who had completed preoperative and annual postoperative bariatric laboratory tests were included. They were divided into patch and pill (control) group.

Results

Seventeen patients were included in the patch and 27 in the pill group. Patients in each group used either patch or pills for 12 months and they were 1 year post LRYGB. Fourteen patients (82.35%) in patch group and 11 patients (40.74%) in pill group had at least 1 deficiency at annual postoperative blood work (P = .0116). Vitamin D deficiency was seen in 81% patients in patch group vs 36% in the pill group (P = .0092). Statistically significant lower postoperative serum concentrations of vitamin D, B1, and B12 were seen in the patch group.

Conclusions

Multivitamin patch users are more likely to have vitamin D deficiency and lower serum concentration of various vitamins and minerals. Future large studies are needed on the efficacy of multivitamin patches before they can be recommended to bariatric patient population.

Keywords

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass Bariatric surgery Vitamin deficiency Transdermal multivitamin patch Oral vitamins 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

For this type of study, formal consent is not required.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.General / Bariatric SurgeryMercy HospitalIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.University of Iowa Hospital and ClinicsIowa CityUSA
  3. 3.Mercy HospitalIowa CityUSA

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